A Dyadic Perspective on Speech Accommodation and Social Connection

Both Partners' Rejection Sensitivity Matters

Lauren Aguilar, Geraldine Downey, Robert Krauss, Jennifer Pardo, Sean Lane, Niall Bolger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Findings from confederate paradigms predict that mimicry is an adaptive route to social connection for rejection-sensitive individuals (Lakin, Chartrand, & Arkin, 2008). However, dyadic perspectives predict that whether mimicry leads to perceived connection depends on the rejection sensitivity (RS) of both partners in an interaction. We investigated these predictions in 50 college women who completed a dyadic cooperative task in which members were matched or mismatched in being dispositionally high or low in RS. We used a psycholinguistics paradigm to assess, through independent listeners' judgments (N=162), how much interacting individuals accommodate phonetic aspects of their speech toward each other. Results confirmed predictions from confederate paradigms in matched RS dyads. However, mismatched dyads showed an asymmetry in levels of accommodation and perceived connection: Those high in RS accommodated more than their low-RS partner but emerged feeling less connected. Mediational analyses indicated that low-RS individuals' nonaccommodation in mismatched dyads helped explain their high-RS partners' relatively low perceived connection to them. Establishing whether mimicry is an adaptive route to social connection requires analyzing mimicry as a dyadic process influenced by the needs of each dyad member.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-177
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Personality
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2016

Fingerprint

Psycholinguistics
Social Distance
Phonetics
Rejection (Psychology)
Emotions

Cite this

Aguilar, Lauren ; Downey, Geraldine ; Krauss, Robert ; Pardo, Jennifer ; Lane, Sean ; Bolger, Niall. / A Dyadic Perspective on Speech Accommodation and Social Connection : Both Partners' Rejection Sensitivity Matters. In: Journal of Personality. 2016 ; Vol. 84, No. 2. pp. 165-177.
@article{be5f65a8fc5f447fa6b6fd06d766ed5e,
title = "A Dyadic Perspective on Speech Accommodation and Social Connection: Both Partners' Rejection Sensitivity Matters",
abstract = "Findings from confederate paradigms predict that mimicry is an adaptive route to social connection for rejection-sensitive individuals (Lakin, Chartrand, & Arkin, 2008). However, dyadic perspectives predict that whether mimicry leads to perceived connection depends on the rejection sensitivity (RS) of both partners in an interaction. We investigated these predictions in 50 college women who completed a dyadic cooperative task in which members were matched or mismatched in being dispositionally high or low in RS. We used a psycholinguistics paradigm to assess, through independent listeners' judgments (N=162), how much interacting individuals accommodate phonetic aspects of their speech toward each other. Results confirmed predictions from confederate paradigms in matched RS dyads. However, mismatched dyads showed an asymmetry in levels of accommodation and perceived connection: Those high in RS accommodated more than their low-RS partner but emerged feeling less connected. Mediational analyses indicated that low-RS individuals' nonaccommodation in mismatched dyads helped explain their high-RS partners' relatively low perceived connection to them. Establishing whether mimicry is an adaptive route to social connection requires analyzing mimicry as a dyadic process influenced by the needs of each dyad member.",
author = "Lauren Aguilar and Geraldine Downey and Robert Krauss and Jennifer Pardo and Sean Lane and Niall Bolger",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jopy.12149",
language = "English",
volume = "84",
pages = "165--177",
journal = "Journal of Personality",
issn = "0022-3506",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "2",

}

A Dyadic Perspective on Speech Accommodation and Social Connection : Both Partners' Rejection Sensitivity Matters. / Aguilar, Lauren; Downey, Geraldine; Krauss, Robert; Pardo, Jennifer; Lane, Sean; Bolger, Niall.

In: Journal of Personality, Vol. 84, No. 2, 01.04.2016, p. 165-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Dyadic Perspective on Speech Accommodation and Social Connection

T2 - Both Partners' Rejection Sensitivity Matters

AU - Aguilar, Lauren

AU - Downey, Geraldine

AU - Krauss, Robert

AU - Pardo, Jennifer

AU - Lane, Sean

AU - Bolger, Niall

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - Findings from confederate paradigms predict that mimicry is an adaptive route to social connection for rejection-sensitive individuals (Lakin, Chartrand, & Arkin, 2008). However, dyadic perspectives predict that whether mimicry leads to perceived connection depends on the rejection sensitivity (RS) of both partners in an interaction. We investigated these predictions in 50 college women who completed a dyadic cooperative task in which members were matched or mismatched in being dispositionally high or low in RS. We used a psycholinguistics paradigm to assess, through independent listeners' judgments (N=162), how much interacting individuals accommodate phonetic aspects of their speech toward each other. Results confirmed predictions from confederate paradigms in matched RS dyads. However, mismatched dyads showed an asymmetry in levels of accommodation and perceived connection: Those high in RS accommodated more than their low-RS partner but emerged feeling less connected. Mediational analyses indicated that low-RS individuals' nonaccommodation in mismatched dyads helped explain their high-RS partners' relatively low perceived connection to them. Establishing whether mimicry is an adaptive route to social connection requires analyzing mimicry as a dyadic process influenced by the needs of each dyad member.

AB - Findings from confederate paradigms predict that mimicry is an adaptive route to social connection for rejection-sensitive individuals (Lakin, Chartrand, & Arkin, 2008). However, dyadic perspectives predict that whether mimicry leads to perceived connection depends on the rejection sensitivity (RS) of both partners in an interaction. We investigated these predictions in 50 college women who completed a dyadic cooperative task in which members were matched or mismatched in being dispositionally high or low in RS. We used a psycholinguistics paradigm to assess, through independent listeners' judgments (N=162), how much interacting individuals accommodate phonetic aspects of their speech toward each other. Results confirmed predictions from confederate paradigms in matched RS dyads. However, mismatched dyads showed an asymmetry in levels of accommodation and perceived connection: Those high in RS accommodated more than their low-RS partner but emerged feeling less connected. Mediational analyses indicated that low-RS individuals' nonaccommodation in mismatched dyads helped explain their high-RS partners' relatively low perceived connection to them. Establishing whether mimicry is an adaptive route to social connection requires analyzing mimicry as a dyadic process influenced by the needs of each dyad member.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959907412&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jopy.12149

DO - 10.1111/jopy.12149

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 165

EP - 177

JO - Journal of Personality

JF - Journal of Personality

SN - 0022-3506

IS - 2

ER -