A Longitudinal Examination of Work–Family Balance among Working Mothers in the United States: Testing Bioecological Theory

Hassan Raza, Joseph G. Grzywacz, Miriam Linver, Brad van Eeden-Moorefield, Soyoung Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study used a bioecological framework to examine three moderated-mediation models testing the mediating effects of positive work-to-family spillover and positive family-to-work spillover in the relationship between a nonstandard work schedule and work–family balance as well as between relationship quality and work-to-family balance. The moderating effects of education, family–friendly workplace policies, and race in the aforementioned models also were tested. Path analyses were used with longitudinal data from four-time periods to test the models. Results showed family-to-work spillover mediated the relationship between relationship quality and work–family balance in two models, whereas the availability of family–friendly policies significantly moderated these relationships. Relationship quality was one of the most consistently significant variables across all models, suggesting its role in helping establish work-family balance is particularly influential regardless of context. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Family and Economic Issues
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Bioecological theory
  • Path analysis
  • Relationship quality
  • Spillover effects
  • Work–family balance

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