A longitudinal examination of work–family conflict among working mothers in the United States

Hassan Raza, Brad van Eeden-Moorefield, Joseph G. Grzywacz, Miriam R. Linver, Soyoung Lee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current longitudinal study investigated the within-and between-person variance in work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict among working mothers over time. It also examined the effects of a nonstandard work schedule and relationship quality on work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict using bioecological theory. Results of multilevel modeling analyses showed that there was significant within-and between-person variance in work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict. The linear and quadratic terms were significantly related to family-to-work conflict, whereas the quadratic term was significantly associated with work-to-family conflict. There was also a positive relationship between a nonstandard work schedule and work-to-family conflict, whereas relationship quality was negatively associated with family-to-work conflict. Future studies should consider diversity among working mothers to adequately predict work–family conflict. The current study provides important implications for employers to consider, concerning within-and between-person differences among working mothers, which could in turn allow for accommodations and help to decrease work–family conflict.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationContemporary Perspectives in Family Research
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Pages107-129
Number of pages23
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018

Publication series

NameContemporary Perspectives in Family Research
Volume13
ISSN (Print)1530-3535

Keywords

  • Bioecological theory
  • Family-to-work conflict
  • Multilevel modeling
  • Relationship quality
  • Within-and between-person differences
  • Work-to-family conflict

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    Raza, H., van Eeden-Moorefield, B., Grzywacz, J. G., Linver, M. R., & Lee, S. (2018). A longitudinal examination of work–family conflict among working mothers in the United States. In Contemporary Perspectives in Family Research (pp. 107-129). (Contemporary Perspectives in Family Research; Vol. 13). Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1530-353520180000013007