A qualitative assessment of a foreign language whole language class

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study had two goals: (1) to provide insights on how to assess a Whole-Language Foreign Language Class (WLFLC), and (2) to field test qualitative research methods for a WLFLC. The setting was a Hebrew-language class based on eight established principles of WLFLCs. The class was assessed through the analysis of formal semistructured interviews with four students; students' reflective midterm papers and final class evaluations (from their portfolios); and the teacher/researcher's reflective journal, which included field notes and anecdotal records. Three themes emerged: (1) Tensions between teacher- and student-centered instruction; (2) tensions between negotiated and predetermined curricula; and (3) becoming part of a multicultural/multilingual community.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-84
Number of pages8
JournalForeign Language Annals
Volume36
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2003

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foreign language
language
student
teacher
qualitative method
research method
qualitative research
instruction
curriculum
interview
evaluation
community

Cite this

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A qualitative assessment of a foreign language whole language class. / Schwarzer, David.

In: Foreign Language Annals, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.12.2003, p. 77-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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