A spatial analysis of student binge drinking, alcohol-outlet density, and social disadvantages

Celia C. Lo, Joe Weber, Tyrone Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: This paper examined whether and how student binge drinking at the individual level was influenced by population disadvantages, community instability, alcohol-outlet density, and protective factors generated by community and school. Methods: We used a dataset collected in 2002 by the Alabama Department of Mental Health, with additional materials generated by the 2000 Census and from the Alabama State Department of Education. School-catchments were employed as geographic units of analysis. The final sample comprised 78,138 public-school students in grades 6-12 who attended schools located in the 566 school-catchments. Results: We hypothesized the presence of spatial processes that, once identified, would enhance understanding of student binge drinking. Our results confirmed that student binge drinking in a focal area was affected by that area's structural factors and also by individual-level risk and protective factors. The results did not support the hypothesized impact of surrounding areas' characteristics on student binge drinking in the focal area. Conclusions and Scientific Significance: The results of our study clearly indicate that both environment-based factors and individual-level risk and protective factors are important in explaining student binge drinking in Alabama.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-401
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2013

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Binge Drinking
Spatial Analysis
Alcohols
Students
Censuses
Mental Health
Education
Population
Protective Factors

Cite this

Lo, Celia C. ; Weber, Joe ; Cheng, Tyrone. / A spatial analysis of student binge drinking, alcohol-outlet density, and social disadvantages. In: American Journal on Addictions. 2013 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 391-401.
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A spatial analysis of student binge drinking, alcohol-outlet density, and social disadvantages. / Lo, Celia C.; Weber, Joe; Cheng, Tyrone.

In: American Journal on Addictions, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.07.2013, p. 391-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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