Acknowledging Barriers in Adopting Person-Centered Planning

Steve Holburn, Peter Vietze

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An apparent contradiction in adopting person-centered planning is exemplified by the question "If a system adopts person-centered planning, isn't it system-centered"? Such ambiguities are obvious to employees, who increasingly are being asked to consider more personalized ways of assisting people through person-centered planning. Our premise in this article is that employees' reservations are well-founded and should be addressed in order to facilitate understanding and eventual reconciliation of unavoidable conflicts that emerge when person-centered planning is undertaken by agency employees. Administrators who acknowledge the uncertainties accompanying person-centered planning and invite discussion about conceptual and practical difficulties inherent in its adoption are modeling a collaborative method of discovering ways to help people get what they need. Examples of group solutions are presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-124
Number of pages8
JournalMental Retardation
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 1999

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planning
human being
employee
Administrative Personnel
reconciliation
Uncertainty
uncertainty
Group

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Acknowledging Barriers in Adopting Person-Centered Planning. / Holburn, Steve; Vietze, Peter.

In: Mental Retardation, Vol. 37, No. 2, 01.04.1999, p. 117-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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