Adolescent social anxiety: Bridging cognitive and social behavioral perspectives through a developmental lens

Anne C. Miers, Carrie Masia Warner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social anxiety is characterized by fear of negative evaluation and discomfort and avoidance in social or performance situations. Existing on a continuum, the clinical diagnosis, social anxiety disorder, typically has its onset in the early to mid-teenage years. It is among the most impairing mental disorders but one of the least treated. SAD is described as the “prototypical adolescent disorder,” yet no theoretical models, specific to adolescents, exist to delineate the factors central to the persistence of their social fears. This chapter reviews recent research on processes involved in the maintenance of social anxiety: cognitive, social behavioral, and fear extinction. These factors are integrated into a comprehensive adolescent-specific maintenance model of social anxiety. Central to the model is the importance of the social context, negative peer responses, and their interaction with negative social self-perceptions. We propose avenues for intervention that aim to leverage the natural social environment and peers to strengthen existing approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook of Lifespan Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Subtitle of host publicationChildhood, Adolescence, Pregnancy, Adulthood, and Aging
PublisherElsevier
Pages89-100
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9780323857574
ISBN (Print)9780323856362
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2023

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Awkward social performance
  • Fear extinction
  • Negative peer responses
  • Negative social self-perceptions
  • Social anxiety

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