Adolescents' aggressive and prosocial behavior: Associations with jealousy and social anxiety

Carmen M. Culotta, Sara Goldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined how relational aggression, physical aggression, and proactive prosocial behavior were associated with jealousy and social anxiety in a diverse sample of 60 middle school students. After the authors controlled for gender and race, jealousy predicted relational aggression and proactive prosocial behavior, but it did not predict physical aggression. Additionally, social anxiety predicted proactive prosocial behavior. Adolescents who were more jealous in their peer relationships also tended to engage in relational aggression and proactive prosocial behavior, and adolescents who were more socially anxious also tended to be proactively prosocial. The authors discuss the implications of these findings and suggest directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-33
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Genetic Psychology
Volume169
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2008

Fingerprint

Jealousy
jealousy
Aggression
aggression
Anxiety
anxiety
adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Students
gender
student

Keywords

  • Jealousy
  • Relational aggression
  • Social anxiety
  • Social development

Cite this

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Adolescents' aggressive and prosocial behavior : Associations with jealousy and social anxiety. / Culotta, Carmen M.; Goldstein, Sara.

In: Journal of Genetic Psychology, Vol. 169, No. 1, 01.03.2008, p. 21-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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