Ambient iron-mediated aeration (IMA) for water reuse

Yang Deng, James D. Englehardt, Samer Abdul-Aziz, Tristan Bataille, Josenrique Cueto, Omar De Leon, Mary E. Wright, Piero Gardinali, Aarthi Narayanan, Jose Polar, Shibata Tomoyuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Global water shortages caused by rapidly expanding population, escalating water consumption, and dwindling water reserves have rendered water reuse a strategically significant approach to meet current and future water demand. This study is the first to our knowledge to evaluate the technical feasibility of iron-mediated aeration (IMA), an innovative, potentially economical, holistic, oxidizing co-precipitation process operating at room temperature, atmospheric pressure, and neutral pH, for water reuse. In the IMA process, dissolved oxygen (O2) was continuously activated by zero-valent iron (Fe0) to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) at ambient pH, temperature, and pressure. Concurrently, iron sludge was generated as a result of iron corrosion. Bench-scale tests were conducted to study the performance of IMA for treatment of secondary effluent, natural surface water, and simulated contaminated water. The following removal efficiencies were achieved: 82.2% glyoxylic acid, ∼100% formaldehyde as an oxidation product of glyoxylic acid, 94% of Ca2+ and associated alkalinity, 44% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 26% of electrical conductivity (EC), 98% of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), 80% of 17β-estradiol (E2), 45% of total nitrogen (TN), 96% of total phosphorus (TP), 99.8% of total Cr, >90% of total Ni, 99% of color, 3.2 log removal of total coliform, and 2.4 log removal of E. Coli. Removal was attributed principally to chemical oxidation, precipitation, co-precipitation, coagulation, adsorption, and air stripping concurrently occurring during the IMA treatment. Results suggest that IMA is a promising treatment technology for water reuse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)850-858
Number of pages9
JournalWater Research
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2013

Fingerprint

Water aeration
aeration
Iron
iron
Water
Coprecipitation
oxidation
Oxidation
Acids
water reuse
acid
Chemical oxygen demand
phthalate
Dissolved oxygen
Alkalinity
Coagulation
water demand
Surface waters
formaldehyde
Formaldehyde

Keywords

  • Adsorption
  • Coagulation
  • Dissolved oxygen
  • Iron
  • Oxidation
  • Water reuse

Cite this

Deng, Y., Englehardt, J. D., Abdul-Aziz, S., Bataille, T., Cueto, J., De Leon, O., ... Tomoyuki, S. (2013). Ambient iron-mediated aeration (IMA) for water reuse. Water Research, 47(2), 850-858. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2012.11.005
Deng, Yang ; Englehardt, James D. ; Abdul-Aziz, Samer ; Bataille, Tristan ; Cueto, Josenrique ; De Leon, Omar ; Wright, Mary E. ; Gardinali, Piero ; Narayanan, Aarthi ; Polar, Jose ; Tomoyuki, Shibata. / Ambient iron-mediated aeration (IMA) for water reuse. In: Water Research. 2013 ; Vol. 47, No. 2. pp. 850-858.
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abstract = "Global water shortages caused by rapidly expanding population, escalating water consumption, and dwindling water reserves have rendered water reuse a strategically significant approach to meet current and future water demand. This study is the first to our knowledge to evaluate the technical feasibility of iron-mediated aeration (IMA), an innovative, potentially economical, holistic, oxidizing co-precipitation process operating at room temperature, atmospheric pressure, and neutral pH, for water reuse. In the IMA process, dissolved oxygen (O2) was continuously activated by zero-valent iron (Fe0) to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) at ambient pH, temperature, and pressure. Concurrently, iron sludge was generated as a result of iron corrosion. Bench-scale tests were conducted to study the performance of IMA for treatment of secondary effluent, natural surface water, and simulated contaminated water. The following removal efficiencies were achieved: 82.2{\%} glyoxylic acid, ∼100{\%} formaldehyde as an oxidation product of glyoxylic acid, 94{\%} of Ca2+ and associated alkalinity, 44{\%} of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 26{\%} of electrical conductivity (EC), 98{\%} of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), 80{\%} of 17β-estradiol (E2), 45{\%} of total nitrogen (TN), 96{\%} of total phosphorus (TP), 99.8{\%} of total Cr, >90{\%} of total Ni, 99{\%} of color, 3.2 log removal of total coliform, and 2.4 log removal of E. Coli. Removal was attributed principally to chemical oxidation, precipitation, co-precipitation, coagulation, adsorption, and air stripping concurrently occurring during the IMA treatment. Results suggest that IMA is a promising treatment technology for water reuse.",
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Deng, Y, Englehardt, JD, Abdul-Aziz, S, Bataille, T, Cueto, J, De Leon, O, Wright, ME, Gardinali, P, Narayanan, A, Polar, J & Tomoyuki, S 2013, 'Ambient iron-mediated aeration (IMA) for water reuse', Water Research, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 850-858. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2012.11.005

Ambient iron-mediated aeration (IMA) for water reuse. / Deng, Yang; Englehardt, James D.; Abdul-Aziz, Samer; Bataille, Tristan; Cueto, Josenrique; De Leon, Omar; Wright, Mary E.; Gardinali, Piero; Narayanan, Aarthi; Polar, Jose; Tomoyuki, Shibata.

In: Water Research, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.02.2013, p. 850-858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Deng, Yang

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AU - Abdul-Aziz, Samer

AU - Bataille, Tristan

AU - Cueto, Josenrique

AU - De Leon, Omar

AU - Wright, Mary E.

AU - Gardinali, Piero

AU - Narayanan, Aarthi

AU - Polar, Jose

AU - Tomoyuki, Shibata

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Deng Y, Englehardt JD, Abdul-Aziz S, Bataille T, Cueto J, De Leon O et al. Ambient iron-mediated aeration (IMA) for water reuse. Water Research. 2013 Feb 1;47(2):850-858. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2012.11.005