An assessment of sleep architecture as a function of degree of handedness in college women using a home sleep monitor

Ruth Propper, Nicole Lawton, Matt Przyborski, Stephen D. Christman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined sleep architecture as a function of handedness in a population of undergraduate college women using a home sleep monitor. Compared to strongly handed individuals, participants with a tendency toward mixed-handedness had a shorter sleep latency and spent a greater percentage of their sleep period asleep and less awake. Increasing mixed-handedness was also associated with increased NREM; strong-handedness was associated with increased REM. Results are placed in a neurophysiological framework wherein corpus callosum mediated differences in interhemispheric interaction during Wake, REM, and NREM on the one hand, and individual differences in corpus callosum morphology and hemispheric communication as a function of handedness on the other, interact to result in handedness differences in sleep architecture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-197
Number of pages12
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Functional Laterality
Sleep
Corpus Callosum
Individuality
Monitor
Handedness
Communication
Population

Keywords

  • Handedness
  • Methodology
  • Mixed-handed
  • NREM
  • REM
  • Sleep

Cite this

Propper, Ruth ; Lawton, Nicole ; Przyborski, Matt ; Christman, Stephen D. / An assessment of sleep architecture as a function of degree of handedness in college women using a home sleep monitor. In: Brain and Cognition. 2004 ; Vol. 54, No. 3. pp. 186-197.
@article{e71b73246b1446faae36d6c76a9cfe6f,
title = "An assessment of sleep architecture as a function of degree of handedness in college women using a home sleep monitor",
abstract = "The present study examined sleep architecture as a function of handedness in a population of undergraduate college women using a home sleep monitor. Compared to strongly handed individuals, participants with a tendency toward mixed-handedness had a shorter sleep latency and spent a greater percentage of their sleep period asleep and less awake. Increasing mixed-handedness was also associated with increased NREM; strong-handedness was associated with increased REM. Results are placed in a neurophysiological framework wherein corpus callosum mediated differences in interhemispheric interaction during Wake, REM, and NREM on the one hand, and individual differences in corpus callosum morphology and hemispheric communication as a function of handedness on the other, interact to result in handedness differences in sleep architecture.",
keywords = "Handedness, Methodology, Mixed-handed, NREM, REM, Sleep",
author = "Ruth Propper and Nicole Lawton and Matt Przyborski and Christman, {Stephen D.}",
year = "2004",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.bandc.2004.01.004",
language = "English",
volume = "54",
pages = "186--197",
journal = "Brain and Cognition",
issn = "0278-2626",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

An assessment of sleep architecture as a function of degree of handedness in college women using a home sleep monitor. / Propper, Ruth; Lawton, Nicole; Przyborski, Matt; Christman, Stephen D.

In: Brain and Cognition, Vol. 54, No. 3, 01.04.2004, p. 186-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - An assessment of sleep architecture as a function of degree of handedness in college women using a home sleep monitor

AU - Propper, Ruth

AU - Lawton, Nicole

AU - Przyborski, Matt

AU - Christman, Stephen D.

PY - 2004/4/1

Y1 - 2004/4/1

N2 - The present study examined sleep architecture as a function of handedness in a population of undergraduate college women using a home sleep monitor. Compared to strongly handed individuals, participants with a tendency toward mixed-handedness had a shorter sleep latency and spent a greater percentage of their sleep period asleep and less awake. Increasing mixed-handedness was also associated with increased NREM; strong-handedness was associated with increased REM. Results are placed in a neurophysiological framework wherein corpus callosum mediated differences in interhemispheric interaction during Wake, REM, and NREM on the one hand, and individual differences in corpus callosum morphology and hemispheric communication as a function of handedness on the other, interact to result in handedness differences in sleep architecture.

AB - The present study examined sleep architecture as a function of handedness in a population of undergraduate college women using a home sleep monitor. Compared to strongly handed individuals, participants with a tendency toward mixed-handedness had a shorter sleep latency and spent a greater percentage of their sleep period asleep and less awake. Increasing mixed-handedness was also associated with increased NREM; strong-handedness was associated with increased REM. Results are placed in a neurophysiological framework wherein corpus callosum mediated differences in interhemispheric interaction during Wake, REM, and NREM on the one hand, and individual differences in corpus callosum morphology and hemispheric communication as a function of handedness on the other, interact to result in handedness differences in sleep architecture.

KW - Handedness

KW - Methodology

KW - Mixed-handed

KW - NREM

KW - REM

KW - Sleep

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1642420475&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bandc.2004.01.004

DO - 10.1016/j.bandc.2004.01.004

M3 - Article

C2 - 15050773

AN - SCOPUS:1642420475

VL - 54

SP - 186

EP - 197

JO - Brain and Cognition

JF - Brain and Cognition

SN - 0278-2626

IS - 3

ER -