An Examination of the Influence of Implicit Theories, Attribution Styles, and Performance Cues on Questionnaire Measures of Leadership

Mark J. Martinko, Brandon Randolph-Seng, Winny Shen, Jeremy R. Brees, Kevin T. Mahoney, Stacey Kessler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the direct and interactive effects of respondents’ implicit leadership theories (ILTs), attribution styles, and performance cues on leadership perceptions. After first assessing respondents’ implicit leadership theories and attribution styles, the participants were randomly assigned to one of nine performance cue conditions ([leader performance: low vs. average vs. high] × [follower performance: low vs. average vs. high]), observed the same leader’s behavior via video, and rated the leader by completing three leadership questionnaires. The results supported the notion that these three components of information have both direct and interactive effects on leadership perceptions as measured by the questionnaires. The three components of information accounted for about 10% of the variance in the three questionnaires. The results contribute to theories of information processing by demonstrating how ILTs, attribution styles, and performance cues interact to predict leadership perceptions. Implications regarding the meaningfulness, construct validity, and utility of leadership scales are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-133
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Leadership and Organizational Studies
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2018

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attribution theory
leadership
examination
questionnaire
performance
leader
Implicit theories
Attribution
Questionnaire
follower
construct validity
information processing
attribution
video
Leadership theory

Keywords

  • cognitive processes
  • leadership
  • leadership and individual differences

Cite this

Martinko, Mark J. ; Randolph-Seng, Brandon ; Shen, Winny ; Brees, Jeremy R. ; Mahoney, Kevin T. ; Kessler, Stacey. / An Examination of the Influence of Implicit Theories, Attribution Styles, and Performance Cues on Questionnaire Measures of Leadership. In: Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies. 2018 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 116-133.
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An Examination of the Influence of Implicit Theories, Attribution Styles, and Performance Cues on Questionnaire Measures of Leadership. / Martinko, Mark J.; Randolph-Seng, Brandon; Shen, Winny; Brees, Jeremy R.; Mahoney, Kevin T.; Kessler, Stacey.

In: Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 116-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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