Assessing the neural correlates of self-enhancement bias: A transcranial magnetic stimulation study

Virginia S.Y. Kwan, Veronica Barrios, Giorgio Ganis, Jamie Gorman, Claudia Lange, Monisha Kumar, Alejandro Shepard, Julian Keenan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Considerable research has focused on overly positive self-perceptions (self-enhancement), and yet little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms. The present study sought to assess the neural correlates of self-enhancement by applying Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) to three brain regions. Twelve participants rated their best friend, as well as the self on a set of desirable or undesirable traits while TMS pulses were delivered in a virtual lesion manner. During the baseline condition (Sham TMS), participants produced more desirable and fewer undesirable ratings for themselves as compared to their best friend, showing self-enhancement. Compared to Sham TMS, TMS delivered to the Medial Prefrontal Cortex (MPFC) reduced self-enhancement whereas TMS delivered to the Supplementary Motor Area (SMA) and the precuneus did not. Together, these findings suggest that the MPFC may influence self-enhancement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)379-385
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume182
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2007

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Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Prefrontal Cortex
Parietal Lobe
Ego
Motor Cortex
Self Concept
Brain
Research

Keywords

  • Medial prefrontal cortex
  • Self-deception
  • Self-enhancement
  • Self-perception
  • TMS
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation

Cite this

Kwan, Virginia S.Y. ; Barrios, Veronica ; Ganis, Giorgio ; Gorman, Jamie ; Lange, Claudia ; Kumar, Monisha ; Shepard, Alejandro ; Keenan, Julian. / Assessing the neural correlates of self-enhancement bias : A transcranial magnetic stimulation study. In: Experimental Brain Research. 2007 ; Vol. 182, No. 3. pp. 379-385.
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Assessing the neural correlates of self-enhancement bias : A transcranial magnetic stimulation study. / Kwan, Virginia S.Y.; Barrios, Veronica; Ganis, Giorgio; Gorman, Jamie; Lange, Claudia; Kumar, Monisha; Shepard, Alejandro; Keenan, Julian.

In: Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 182, No. 3, 01.09.2007, p. 379-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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