Assessment of stigma associated with stuttering

Development and evaluation of the self-stigma of stuttering scale (4S)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To create a psychometrically sound scale that measures different levels of internalized stigma (i.e., self-stigma) among adults who stutter and to analyze factor structure, reliability, and initial construct validity of the scale. Method: Two-hundred ninety-one adults who stutter were recruited from Board Recognized Specialists in Fluency Disorders and the National Stuttering Association. Participants completed a web-based survey including an experimental scale called the Self-Stigma of Stuttering Scale (4S), designed to measure different levels of self-stigma in people who stutter, along with a series of established measures of self-esteem, self-efficacy, and life satisfaction. Results: The experimental scale demonstrated adequate reliability in internal consistency and temporal stability. Factor analysis revealed underlying components supportive of a multidimensional model of stigma. Stigma self-concurrence and, to a lesser extent, stereotype agreement and stigma awareness were negatively correlated with self-esteem, self-efficacy, and life satisfaction, supporting initial construct validity of the scale. Conclusion: Speech-language pathologists can identify the presence of self-stigma in their adult clients who stutter and help them to alter these beliefs. The 4S can be a means for researchers and clinicians to achieve these goals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1517-1529
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume56
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2013

Fingerprint

Stuttering
Self Efficacy
Self Concept
Statistical Factor Analysis
evaluation
Language
Research Personnel
construct validity
self-esteem
self-efficacy
Evaluation
Stigma
stereotype
factor analysis
Pathologists
Surveys and Questionnaires
Stutter

Keywords

  • Assessment
  • Fluency disorders
  • Psychosocial issues
  • Stereotypes
  • Stigma
  • Stuttering

Cite this

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Assessment of stigma associated with stuttering : Development and evaluation of the self-stigma of stuttering scale (4S). / Boyle, Michael.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 56, No. 5, 01.10.2013, p. 1517-1529.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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