Associations Between Social Connectedness, Emotional Well-Being, and Self-Rated Health Among Older Adults: Difference by Relationship Status

Ashley E. Ermer, Christine M. Proulx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study investigates the association between social connectedness (i.e., social network characteristics, family and friend support, and social ties with neighbors), emotional well-being, and self-rated health and whether these associations differ based on respondents’ relationship status among adults aged 62 and older. A series of multigroup generalized structural equation models (GSEMs) were conducted using data from the National Social, Health, and Aging Project. Social connectedness items were mostly positively associated with emotional well-being and self-rated health, and several of these associations are stronger for older adults who are unpartnered versus those who are cohabiting or married. Cohabiting and married individuals do not appear to have the same associations between social network size, friend support, and emotional well-being compared to unpartnered older adults. The present study lends support for how a variety of social supports are vital for older adults and their well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)336-361
Number of pages26
JournalResearch on Aging
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2019

Keywords

  • emotional well-being
  • older adults
  • relationship status
  • self-rated health
  • social networks

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