Benchmarking the redesign of "business process reengineering" curriculum

A continuous process improvement (CPI)

Rashmi Jain, Anithashree Chandrasekaran, Angappa Gunasekaran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the application of business process reengineering (BPR) and benchmarking principles to redesign an undergraduate course on BPR to achieve continuous improvements. The principles are applied on a course on BPR in the curriculum of engineering management (EM) program at Stevens Institute of Technology. The EM program aims to provide the students the knowledge and skills, which are necessary to work effectively at the interface between technology, management, and engineering. BPR course (EM435) is recently added to EM program's curriculum to support the need for providing the bridge between the engineering of systems and business operations. Design/methodology/approach - The research approach design is laid out from the time the EM435 course is first offered in the fall of 2006 to the senior year EM students. The students are surveyed and areas of redesign and improvements are identified based on benchmarking against ABET criteria and their associated outcomes, student expectations, similar academic courses, and industry expectations of skills and knowledge. Findings - The identification of the improvement areas in the BPR curriculum leads to a continuous process improvement (CPI) initiative, which has been continued in a more structured manner. Research findings indicate a strong support for more case studies, use of BPR tool, and real-life project in their investigation of effective pedagogy for teaching BPR to engineering undergraduates. Research limitations/implications - This paper demonstrates the value of applying benchmarking and CPI methodology in maintaining effective teaching and learning of BPR concepts. More empirical metrics can be developed in future to measure the success of course, improvements. Practical implications - The findings of this research will promote adoption of courses on BPR and lay a foundation for BPR curriculum in engineering. The CPI approach will provide opportunities to analyze improvements over a period of time. Originality/value - This paper is unique in its application of benchmarking and CPI for improving BPR curriculum at an undergraduate engineering level.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-94
Number of pages18
JournalBenchmarking
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 13 Apr 2010

Fingerprint

Business process re-engineering
Process improvement
Benchmarking
Curriculum
Redesign
Engineering management
Undergraduate
Pedagogy
Continuous improvement
Methodology
Design methodology
Industry
Technology management

Keywords

  • Benchmarking
  • Business process re-engineering
  • Curricula
  • Education
  • Professional associations
  • Standards

Cite this

Jain, Rashmi ; Chandrasekaran, Anithashree ; Gunasekaran, Angappa. / Benchmarking the redesign of "business process reengineering" curriculum : A continuous process improvement (CPI). In: Benchmarking. 2010 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 77-94.
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Benchmarking the redesign of "business process reengineering" curriculum : A continuous process improvement (CPI). / Jain, Rashmi; Chandrasekaran, Anithashree; Gunasekaran, Angappa.

In: Benchmarking, Vol. 17, No. 1, 13.04.2010, p. 77-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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