Brief report

Parental child-directed speech as a predictor of receptive language in children with autism symptomatology

Twyla Y. Perryman, Alice S. Carter, Daniel S. Messinger, Wendy L. Stone, Andrada Ivanescu, Paul J. Yoder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Facilitative linguistic input directly connected to children's interest and focus of attention has become a recommended component of interventions for young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This longitudinal correlational study used two assessment time points and examined the association between parental undemanding topic-continuing talk related to the child's attentional focus (i.e.; follow-in comments) and later receptive language for 37 parent-child dyads with their young (mean = 21 months, range 15-24 months) children with autism symptomology. The frequency of parental follow-in comments positively predicted later receptive language after considering children's joint attention skills and previous receptive language abilities.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1725
Pages (from-to)1983-1987
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume43
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2013

Fingerprint

Child Language
Autistic Disorder
Language
Aptitude
Linguistics
Longitudinal Studies

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Parent responsiveness
  • Parent-child interaction
  • Receptive language

Cite this

Perryman, Twyla Y. ; Carter, Alice S. ; Messinger, Daniel S. ; Stone, Wendy L. ; Ivanescu, Andrada ; Yoder, Paul J. / Brief report : Parental child-directed speech as a predictor of receptive language in children with autism symptomatology. In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 2013 ; Vol. 43, No. 8. pp. 1983-1987.
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Brief report : Parental child-directed speech as a predictor of receptive language in children with autism symptomatology. / Perryman, Twyla Y.; Carter, Alice S.; Messinger, Daniel S.; Stone, Wendy L.; Ivanescu, Andrada; Yoder, Paul J.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 43, No. 8, 1725, 01.08.2013, p. 1983-1987.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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