Bringing Book Club to Class: Engaging College Students in Reading Content-specific Books Written for Popular Audiences

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Engaging students in completing assigned reading material, particularly textbooks, is a challenge faced by many college professors. Further, research has demonstrated student compliance is typically low with reading course textbooks. This study explores the impact of assigning content-specific books written for popular audiences and having students participate in an associated “book club” in an undergraduate class. Survey findings indicate that most students experienced reading a book written for popular audiences as more engaging and enjoyable than textbook reading. An analysis of student reflection papers provides further evidence that this assignment and associated activities successfully engaged students with content-specific readings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-234
Number of pages10
JournalCollege Teaching
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Oct 2018

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book club
textbook
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Keywords

  • Reading compliance
  • instruction
  • mixed methods research
  • motivation

Cite this

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abstract = "Engaging students in completing assigned reading material, particularly textbooks, is a challenge faced by many college professors. Further, research has demonstrated student compliance is typically low with reading course textbooks. This study explores the impact of assigning content-specific books written for popular audiences and having students participate in an associated “book club” in an undergraduate class. Survey findings indicate that most students experienced reading a book written for popular audiences as more engaging and enjoyable than textbook reading. An analysis of student reflection papers provides further evidence that this assignment and associated activities successfully engaged students with content-specific readings.",
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Bringing Book Club to Class : Engaging College Students in Reading Content-specific Books Written for Popular Audiences. / Sylvan, Lesley.

In: College Teaching, Vol. 66, No. 4, 02.10.2018, p. 225-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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