Central bank independence, inflation variability, and the revenue smoothing hypothesis

Hermann Sintim-Aboagye, David R. Tufte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines the revenue-smoothing hypothesis, which posits that an optimizing government will adjust both taxes and inflation to meet shocks to government spending. Our contribution is to examine this through the lens of a new methodology that relates both the first and second moments of inflation rates to central bank independence (CBI) measures. Unlike existing least-squares-based CBI papers, this study uses a maximum likelihood framework that facilitates the direct inclusion of CBI parameters in the residual covariance matrix. This new approach allows for a more intensive use of information contained in the CBI indexes and the estimates obtained are better reflective of CBI influences. Our results provide stronger evidence confirming the revenue-smoothing hypothesis, in particular for those countries with more independent central banks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-160
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Advances in Economic Research
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2006

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Central bank independence
Smoothing
Inflation variability
Revenue
Inflation
Maximum likelihood
Covariance matrix
Tax
Inflation rate
Methodology
Government spending
Government
Central bank
Least squares
Inclusion

Cite this

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Central bank independence, inflation variability, and the revenue smoothing hypothesis. / Sintim-Aboagye, Hermann; Tufte, David R.

In: International Advances in Economic Research, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.05.2006, p. 147-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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