Children's comprehension of comparative forms

David Townsend

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20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children aged from 3.5 to 5.5 years were tested on their comprehension of the terms taller, shorter, more, and less in five types of sentences: truncated, explicit standard, expanded explicit standard, two-dimensional second-clause subject noun, and two-dimensional second-clause subject pronoun. Many childen performed poorly on less and shorter in truncated sentences; the presence of explicit comparative cues did not improve these children's performance. Children who performed perfectly on truncated sentences still had difficulty understanding two-dimensional comparisons, especially those with a second-clause subject pronoun. These children interpreted only the first clause of the second-clause subject pronoun sentences. The results suggest that many children are capable of understanding two-dimensional comparisons, but perform poorly on the second-clause subject pronoun sentences because of uncertainty about the referent of the pronoun.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-303
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Experimental Child Psychology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1974

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Townsend, David. / Children's comprehension of comparative forms. In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 1974 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 293-303.
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Children's comprehension of comparative forms. / Townsend, David.

In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.01.1974, p. 293-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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