Chronology of the Palmer Deep site, Antarctic Peninsula

A Holocene palaeoenvironmental reference for the circum-Antarctic

E. Domack, A. Leventer, R. Dunbar, F. Taylor, Stefanie Brachfeld, C. Sjunneskog

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

191 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Palmer Deep sediment cores are used to produce the first high-resolution; continuous late Pleistocene to Holocene time-series from the Antarctic marine system. The sedimentary record is dated using accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon methods on acid insoluble organic matter and foraminiferal calcite. Fifty-four radiocarbon analyses are utilized in the dating which provides a calibrated timescale back to 13 ka BP. Reliability of resultant ages on Organic matter is assured because duplicates produce a standard deviation from the surface age of less than laboratory error (i.e., ±50 years). In addition, surface organic matter ages at the site are in excellent agreement with living calcite ages at the accepted reservoir age of ∼1260 years for the Antarctic Peninsula. Spectral analyses of the magnetic susceptibility record against the age model reveal unusually strong periodicity in the 400, ∼200 and 50-70 year frequency bands, similar to other high-resolution records from the Holocene but, so far, unique for the circum-Antarctic. Here we show that comparison to icecore records of specific climatic events (e.g., the 'Little Ice Age', Neoglacial, Hypsithermal, and the Bølling/Allerød to Younger Dryas transition) provides improved focus upon the relative timing of atmosphere/ocean changes between the northern and southern high latitudes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalHolocene
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2001

Fingerprint

chronology
Holocene
organic matter
calcite
Neoglacial
Hypsithermal
Little Ice Age
Younger Dryas
magnetic susceptibility
periodicity
sediment core
Chronology
spectrometer
Pleistocene
time series
timescale
atmosphere
acid
ocean
Organic Matter

Keywords

  • Antarctic Peninsula
  • Chronology
  • Holocene
  • Palmer Deep
  • Periodicity
  • Radiocarbon
  • Sedimentology
  • Spectral analysis

Cite this

Domack, E. ; Leventer, A. ; Dunbar, R. ; Taylor, F. ; Brachfeld, Stefanie ; Sjunneskog, C. / Chronology of the Palmer Deep site, Antarctic Peninsula : A Holocene palaeoenvironmental reference for the circum-Antarctic. In: Holocene. 2001 ; Vol. 11, No. 1. pp. 1-9.
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Chronology of the Palmer Deep site, Antarctic Peninsula : A Holocene palaeoenvironmental reference for the circum-Antarctic. / Domack, E.; Leventer, A.; Dunbar, R.; Taylor, F.; Brachfeld, Stefanie; Sjunneskog, C.

In: Holocene, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.01.2001, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T2 - A Holocene palaeoenvironmental reference for the circum-Antarctic

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AU - Leventer, A.

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