Color Affects Perceived Odor Intensity

Debra Zellner, Mary A. Kautz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

152 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Experiment 1, some odorous solutions (e.g., strawberry) were rated as smelling stronger when colored (e.g., red) than when colorless. Experiment 2 showed this effect to be due to a perceptual change rather than a response to experimental demand characteristics. Experiment 3 showed that the color-induced increase in odor intensity is not due to subjects' preexperimental experience with particular color-odor combinations, because the increase occurred with novel ones. We conclude that color induces a weak olfactory percept that combines with odorant-induced percepts. The effect may be due to conditioning or may be the result of residual intersensory neural connections left over from infancy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-397
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 1990

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Color
Fragaria
Odorants
Experiment
Percept
Conditioning (Psychology)
Conditioning
Infancy

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Zellner, Debra ; Kautz, Mary A. / Color Affects Perceived Odor Intensity. In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. 1990 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 391-397.
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Color Affects Perceived Odor Intensity. / Zellner, Debra; Kautz, Mary A.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.05.1990, p. 391-397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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