“Common” Instruction? Logics of Ability and Teacher Decision Making Across Tracks in the Era of Common Standards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article investigates the interaction between the Common Core State Standards and curricular tracking by examining instructional decision making across tracks in a large metropolitan district. This study draws on institutional logics as a framework to analyze 106 instructional decisions from 24 participants involved in middle school literacy instruction. In lower-track classes, participants often adapted the curriculum and adopted a more teacher-centered approach. About half of the rationales for those decisions reflected a logic of tracking, less than a fifth reflected a logic of differentiation, and almost a third reflected elements of both logics. These findings demonstrate that despite common standards, a tracked school structure continues to serve as a powerful signal about the curriculum and instruction seen as appropriate for different groups of students.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Educational Research Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

instruction
decision making
curriculum
ability
teacher
literacy
district
interaction
school
Group
student

Keywords

  • Common Core State Standards
  • curriculum
  • education policy
  • instruction
  • literacy
  • school districts
  • tracking

Cite this

@article{763c5d4de35f485eb47c85625e8018a0,
title = "“Common” Instruction? Logics of Ability and Teacher Decision Making Across Tracks in the Era of Common Standards",
abstract = "This article investigates the interaction between the Common Core State Standards and curricular tracking by examining instructional decision making across tracks in a large metropolitan district. This study draws on institutional logics as a framework to analyze 106 instructional decisions from 24 participants involved in middle school literacy instruction. In lower-track classes, participants often adapted the curriculum and adopted a more teacher-centered approach. About half of the rationales for those decisions reflected a logic of tracking, less than a fifth reflected a logic of differentiation, and almost a third reflected elements of both logics. These findings demonstrate that despite common standards, a tracked school structure continues to serve as a powerful signal about the curriculum and instruction seen as appropriate for different groups of students.",
keywords = "Common Core State Standards, curriculum, education policy, instruction, literacy, school districts, tracking",
author = "Emily Hodge",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3102/0002831218803328",
language = "English",
journal = "American Educational Research Journal",
issn = "0002-8312",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - “Common” Instruction? Logics of Ability and Teacher Decision Making Across Tracks in the Era of Common Standards

AU - Hodge, Emily

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - This article investigates the interaction between the Common Core State Standards and curricular tracking by examining instructional decision making across tracks in a large metropolitan district. This study draws on institutional logics as a framework to analyze 106 instructional decisions from 24 participants involved in middle school literacy instruction. In lower-track classes, participants often adapted the curriculum and adopted a more teacher-centered approach. About half of the rationales for those decisions reflected a logic of tracking, less than a fifth reflected a logic of differentiation, and almost a third reflected elements of both logics. These findings demonstrate that despite common standards, a tracked school structure continues to serve as a powerful signal about the curriculum and instruction seen as appropriate for different groups of students.

AB - This article investigates the interaction between the Common Core State Standards and curricular tracking by examining instructional decision making across tracks in a large metropolitan district. This study draws on institutional logics as a framework to analyze 106 instructional decisions from 24 participants involved in middle school literacy instruction. In lower-track classes, participants often adapted the curriculum and adopted a more teacher-centered approach. About half of the rationales for those decisions reflected a logic of tracking, less than a fifth reflected a logic of differentiation, and almost a third reflected elements of both logics. These findings demonstrate that despite common standards, a tracked school structure continues to serve as a powerful signal about the curriculum and instruction seen as appropriate for different groups of students.

KW - Common Core State Standards

KW - curriculum

KW - education policy

KW - instruction

KW - literacy

KW - school districts

KW - tracking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059529430&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3102/0002831218803328

DO - 10.3102/0002831218803328

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85059529430

JO - American Educational Research Journal

JF - American Educational Research Journal

SN - 0002-8312

ER -