Comparing different types of child abuse and spouse abuse offenders

Joe F. Pittman, Chih-Yuan Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined differences in offenders' background characteristics, personal and interpersonal problems, and family climate between three types of child abuse offenders (neglecters, physical abusers, and psychological abusers) and two forms of spouse abuse offenders (physical abusers and psychological abusers) in two large samples (child abuse n = 2,910; spouse abuse; n = 7,035) of cases officially identified over a 8-year period (1988-1995) by the U.S. Air Force Family Advocacy Program. Comparisons addressed demographic factors, personal and interpersonal problems, and aspects of family climate. Among child abusers, results supported the conclusion that types of child abuse varied with offender demographics and family climate factors. For spouse abusers, however, types of abuse were not as distinctly different in terms of the comparison variables. In general, therefore, for child abuse-but not for spouse abuse-findings challenge the view of abuse as a unitary phenomenon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-156
Number of pages20
JournalViolence and Victims
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Spouse Abuse
abuse of children
Child Abuse
spouse
offender
abuse
Climate
Demography
Psychology
climate
Spouses
family program
Air
air force
demographic factors

Cite this

@article{faf0719dbd5b4b2696aa865f251d2ccd,
title = "Comparing different types of child abuse and spouse abuse offenders",
abstract = "This study examined differences in offenders' background characteristics, personal and interpersonal problems, and family climate between three types of child abuse offenders (neglecters, physical abusers, and psychological abusers) and two forms of spouse abuse offenders (physical abusers and psychological abusers) in two large samples (child abuse n = 2,910; spouse abuse; n = 7,035) of cases officially identified over a 8-year period (1988-1995) by the U.S. Air Force Family Advocacy Program. Comparisons addressed demographic factors, personal and interpersonal problems, and aspects of family climate. Among child abusers, results supported the conclusion that types of child abuse varied with offender demographics and family climate factors. For spouse abusers, however, types of abuse were not as distinctly different in terms of the comparison variables. In general, therefore, for child abuse-but not for spouse abuse-findings challenge the view of abuse as a unitary phenomenon.",
author = "Pittman, {Joe F.} and Chih-Yuan Lee",
year = "2004",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1891/vivi.19.2.137.64098",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "137--156",
journal = "Violence and Victims",
issn = "0886-6708",
publisher = "Springer Publishing Company",
number = "2",

}

Comparing different types of child abuse and spouse abuse offenders. / Pittman, Joe F.; Lee, Chih-Yuan.

In: Violence and Victims, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.04.2004, p. 137-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing different types of child abuse and spouse abuse offenders

AU - Pittman, Joe F.

AU - Lee, Chih-Yuan

PY - 2004/4/1

Y1 - 2004/4/1

N2 - This study examined differences in offenders' background characteristics, personal and interpersonal problems, and family climate between three types of child abuse offenders (neglecters, physical abusers, and psychological abusers) and two forms of spouse abuse offenders (physical abusers and psychological abusers) in two large samples (child abuse n = 2,910; spouse abuse; n = 7,035) of cases officially identified over a 8-year period (1988-1995) by the U.S. Air Force Family Advocacy Program. Comparisons addressed demographic factors, personal and interpersonal problems, and aspects of family climate. Among child abusers, results supported the conclusion that types of child abuse varied with offender demographics and family climate factors. For spouse abusers, however, types of abuse were not as distinctly different in terms of the comparison variables. In general, therefore, for child abuse-but not for spouse abuse-findings challenge the view of abuse as a unitary phenomenon.

AB - This study examined differences in offenders' background characteristics, personal and interpersonal problems, and family climate between three types of child abuse offenders (neglecters, physical abusers, and psychological abusers) and two forms of spouse abuse offenders (physical abusers and psychological abusers) in two large samples (child abuse n = 2,910; spouse abuse; n = 7,035) of cases officially identified over a 8-year period (1988-1995) by the U.S. Air Force Family Advocacy Program. Comparisons addressed demographic factors, personal and interpersonal problems, and aspects of family climate. Among child abusers, results supported the conclusion that types of child abuse varied with offender demographics and family climate factors. For spouse abusers, however, types of abuse were not as distinctly different in terms of the comparison variables. In general, therefore, for child abuse-but not for spouse abuse-findings challenge the view of abuse as a unitary phenomenon.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4243141765&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1891/vivi.19.2.137.64098

DO - 10.1891/vivi.19.2.137.64098

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 137

EP - 156

JO - Violence and Victims

JF - Violence and Victims

SN - 0886-6708

IS - 2

ER -