Conventions, habits, and U.S. teachers’ meanings for graphs

Kevin C. Moore, Jason Silverman, Teo Paoletti, Dave Liss, Stacy Musgrave

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this paper, we use relevant literature and data to motivate a more detailed look into relationships between what we perceive to be conventions common to United States (U.S.) school mathematics and individuals’ meanings for graphs and related topics. Specifically, we draw on data from pre-service (PST) and in-service (IST) teachers to characterize such relationships. We use PSTs’ responses during clinical interviews to illustrate three themes: (a) some PSTs’ responses implied practices we perceive to be conventions of U.S. school mathematics were instead inherent aspects of PSTs’ meanings; (b) some PSTs’ responses implied they understood certain practices in U.S. school mathematics as customary choices not necessary to represent particular mathematical ideas; and (c) some PSTs’ responses exhibited what we or they perceived to be contradictory actions and claims. We then compare our PST findings to data collected with ISTs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)179-195
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Mathematical Behavior
Volume53
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2019

Fingerprint

Mathematics
Habits
habits
mathematics
teacher
Graph in graph theory
school
Interviews
interview
Necessary
Meaning
Relationships

Keywords

  • Conventions
  • Function
  • Graphs
  • Quantitative reasoning

Cite this

Moore, Kevin C. ; Silverman, Jason ; Paoletti, Teo ; Liss, Dave ; Musgrave, Stacy. / Conventions, habits, and U.S. teachers’ meanings for graphs. In: Journal of Mathematical Behavior. 2019 ; Vol. 53. pp. 179-195.
@article{b52e4d990ef74336835bb1fbb3a74194,
title = "Conventions, habits, and U.S. teachers’ meanings for graphs",
abstract = "In this paper, we use relevant literature and data to motivate a more detailed look into relationships between what we perceive to be conventions common to United States (U.S.) school mathematics and individuals’ meanings for graphs and related topics. Specifically, we draw on data from pre-service (PST) and in-service (IST) teachers to characterize such relationships. We use PSTs’ responses during clinical interviews to illustrate three themes: (a) some PSTs’ responses implied practices we perceive to be conventions of U.S. school mathematics were instead inherent aspects of PSTs’ meanings; (b) some PSTs’ responses implied they understood certain practices in U.S. school mathematics as customary choices not necessary to represent particular mathematical ideas; and (c) some PSTs’ responses exhibited what we or they perceived to be contradictory actions and claims. We then compare our PST findings to data collected with ISTs.",
keywords = "Conventions, Function, Graphs, Quantitative reasoning",
author = "Moore, {Kevin C.} and Jason Silverman and Teo Paoletti and Dave Liss and Stacy Musgrave",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jmathb.2018.08.002",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "179--195",
journal = "Journal of Mathematical Behavior",
issn = "0732-3123",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

Conventions, habits, and U.S. teachers’ meanings for graphs. / Moore, Kevin C.; Silverman, Jason; Paoletti, Teo; Liss, Dave; Musgrave, Stacy.

In: Journal of Mathematical Behavior, Vol. 53, 01.03.2019, p. 179-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Conventions, habits, and U.S. teachers’ meanings for graphs

AU - Moore, Kevin C.

AU - Silverman, Jason

AU - Paoletti, Teo

AU - Liss, Dave

AU - Musgrave, Stacy

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - In this paper, we use relevant literature and data to motivate a more detailed look into relationships between what we perceive to be conventions common to United States (U.S.) school mathematics and individuals’ meanings for graphs and related topics. Specifically, we draw on data from pre-service (PST) and in-service (IST) teachers to characterize such relationships. We use PSTs’ responses during clinical interviews to illustrate three themes: (a) some PSTs’ responses implied practices we perceive to be conventions of U.S. school mathematics were instead inherent aspects of PSTs’ meanings; (b) some PSTs’ responses implied they understood certain practices in U.S. school mathematics as customary choices not necessary to represent particular mathematical ideas; and (c) some PSTs’ responses exhibited what we or they perceived to be contradictory actions and claims. We then compare our PST findings to data collected with ISTs.

AB - In this paper, we use relevant literature and data to motivate a more detailed look into relationships between what we perceive to be conventions common to United States (U.S.) school mathematics and individuals’ meanings for graphs and related topics. Specifically, we draw on data from pre-service (PST) and in-service (IST) teachers to characterize such relationships. We use PSTs’ responses during clinical interviews to illustrate three themes: (a) some PSTs’ responses implied practices we perceive to be conventions of U.S. school mathematics were instead inherent aspects of PSTs’ meanings; (b) some PSTs’ responses implied they understood certain practices in U.S. school mathematics as customary choices not necessary to represent particular mathematical ideas; and (c) some PSTs’ responses exhibited what we or they perceived to be contradictory actions and claims. We then compare our PST findings to data collected with ISTs.

KW - Conventions

KW - Function

KW - Graphs

KW - Quantitative reasoning

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052139217&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jmathb.2018.08.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jmathb.2018.08.002

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85052139217

VL - 53

SP - 179

EP - 195

JO - Journal of Mathematical Behavior

JF - Journal of Mathematical Behavior

SN - 0732-3123

ER -