Corporate sustainability programs and reporting: Responsibility commitment and thought leadership at Starbucks

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Building upon the thesis of Baden and Harwood (2013) that "terminology matters" in describing sustainability programs and corporate social responsibility reporting efforts, this chapter examines how an organization rhetorically self-defines its specific degree or level of "responsibility" in a particular industry or within an industry sector in its actions as well as its non-financial reporting efforts. Starbucks's evolution in developing sustainability programs and their sustainability reporting over a 12-year period are examined as a case example. Being both praised and criticized, Starbucks provides an instructive example of the evolution of corporate responsibility in a customer-facing enterprise. A model of both internal and external drivers of corporate social responsibility and sustainability progress is proposed and applied to the Starbucks case.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEmpowering Organizations through Corporate Social Responsibility
PublisherIGI Global
Pages307-323
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781466672956
ISBN (Print)1466672943, 9781466672949
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Nov 2014

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sustainability
commitment
leadership
responsibility
social responsibility
Baden
industry
technical language
customer
driver
organization
Industry
Sustainability
Corporate sustainability
Corporate Social Responsibility
Responsibility
Sustainability reporting
Corporate responsibility
Social sustainability

Cite this

Kay, Mark. / Corporate sustainability programs and reporting : Responsibility commitment and thought leadership at Starbucks. Empowering Organizations through Corporate Social Responsibility. IGI Global, 2014. pp. 307-323
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Corporate sustainability programs and reporting : Responsibility commitment and thought leadership at Starbucks. / Kay, Mark.

Empowering Organizations through Corporate Social Responsibility. IGI Global, 2014. p. 307-323.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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