Developing sustainable models of arsenic-mitigation technologies in the middle-ganga Plain in India

Sushant K. Singh, Robert W. Taylor, Haiyan Su

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study seeks to understand factors that guide the decision-making process to adopt and implement the available arsenic-mitigation technologies in rural areas in the middle-Ganga Plain in India. A total of 340 households comprising 2500 people were surveyed. Socio-economic and demographic factors, water and sanitation status, time spent and distance travelled to collect water, arsenic awareness, willingness to pay (WTP) for arsenic-free water, people's trust in others and in institutions, social capital in communities, and preferences for sustainable arsenic-mitigation options were investigated. Arsenic treatment units (filters) and piped water supply systems were the most preferred sustainable arsenic-mitigation options in the surveyed villages. Less preferred arsenic-mitigation options include deep tube wells, dug wells, and rainwater harvesting systems. Binary logistic regression models for each arsenic-mitigation option were produced. Arsenic awareness, WTP, trust in agencies, trust in institutions and social capital were found to be the most significant factors for decision-making for preferring one arsenic-mitigation technology over the others. We recommend a mixed model of two arsenic-mitigation options for the studied individuals, which could be a sustainable arsenic-mitigation option for them, considering their socio-economic and demographic conditions. Existing institutions should be strengthened, agencies empowered, and communities enlightened about arsenic problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)80-93
Number of pages14
JournalCurrent Science
Volume113
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Jul 2017

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arsenic
mitigation
social capital
willingness to pay
plain
decision making
well
sanitation
rainwater
water
rural area
logistics
village
water supply
filter

Keywords

  • Arsenic treatment unit
  • Arsenic-mitigation
  • Deep tube well
  • Dug wells
  • Piped water supply
  • Rainwater harvesting system

Cite this

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abstract = "This study seeks to understand factors that guide the decision-making process to adopt and implement the available arsenic-mitigation technologies in rural areas in the middle-Ganga Plain in India. A total of 340 households comprising 2500 people were surveyed. Socio-economic and demographic factors, water and sanitation status, time spent and distance travelled to collect water, arsenic awareness, willingness to pay (WTP) for arsenic-free water, people's trust in others and in institutions, social capital in communities, and preferences for sustainable arsenic-mitigation options were investigated. Arsenic treatment units (filters) and piped water supply systems were the most preferred sustainable arsenic-mitigation options in the surveyed villages. Less preferred arsenic-mitigation options include deep tube wells, dug wells, and rainwater harvesting systems. Binary logistic regression models for each arsenic-mitigation option were produced. Arsenic awareness, WTP, trust in agencies, trust in institutions and social capital were found to be the most significant factors for decision-making for preferring one arsenic-mitigation technology over the others. We recommend a mixed model of two arsenic-mitigation options for the studied individuals, which could be a sustainable arsenic-mitigation option for them, considering their socio-economic and demographic conditions. Existing institutions should be strengthened, agencies empowered, and communities enlightened about arsenic problems.",
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Developing sustainable models of arsenic-mitigation technologies in the middle-ganga Plain in India. / Singh, Sushant K.; Taylor, Robert W.; Su, Haiyan.

In: Current Science, Vol. 113, No. 1, 10.07.2017, p. 80-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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