Differences in the GH-IGF-I axis in children of different weight and fitness status

Peter Hosick, Robert G. McMurray, A. C. Hackney, Claudio L. Battaglini, Terry P. Combs, Joanne S. Harrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine if differences in the GH-IGF-I axis exist between children of high and low aerobic fitness who are obese or of normal weight. Design: 124 children (ages 8-11) divided into four groups based on BMI and VO 2max (mL O 2/kg fat free mass(FFM)/min): normal weight - high-fit (NH), normal weight - low-fit (NL), obese - high-fit (OH), and obese - low-fit (OL). Height, weight, skinfolds, body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage and predicted VO 2max (both ml/kg/min and ml/kg FFM/min) were assessed. Resting growth hormone (GH), total insulin-like growth factor 1 (total IGF-I), free insulin-like growth factor 1(free IGF-I), and insulin were measured using morning fasting blood samples. Results: GH was greater in the NH group compared to the OL group only (p<0.01). No group differences existed for either total IGF-I (p=0.53) or free IGF-I (p=0.189). Insulin was greater in the OH and OL groups than the NH and NL groups (p<0.01). With groups combined (or overall), insulin and free IGF-I were related to fitness (insulin - ml/kg/min: r=-0.226, p<0.05 and ml/kg FFM/min: r=-0.212, p<0.05; free IGF-I - ml/kg/min: r=-0.219, p<0.01 and ml/kg FFM/min: r=-0.272, p<0.05). Conclusions: Fitness may contribute to the obesity related reduction of GH that may be involved with weight gain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-91
Number of pages5
JournalGrowth Hormone and IGF Research
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2012

Fingerprint

Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Growth Hormone
Weights and Measures
Fats
Insulin
Somatomedins
Body Mass Index
Weight Gain
Adipose Tissue
Fasting
Obesity

Keywords

  • Aerobic fitness
  • Fat free mass
  • Insulin
  • VO max
  • Youth

Cite this

Hosick, P., McMurray, R. G., Hackney, A. C., Battaglini, C. L., Combs, T. P., & Harrell, J. S. (2012). Differences in the GH-IGF-I axis in children of different weight and fitness status. Growth Hormone and IGF Research, 22(2), 87-91. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ghir.2012.02.007
Hosick, Peter ; McMurray, Robert G. ; Hackney, A. C. ; Battaglini, Claudio L. ; Combs, Terry P. ; Harrell, Joanne S. / Differences in the GH-IGF-I axis in children of different weight and fitness status. In: Growth Hormone and IGF Research. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 87-91.
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Differences in the GH-IGF-I axis in children of different weight and fitness status. / Hosick, Peter; McMurray, Robert G.; Hackney, A. C.; Battaglini, Claudio L.; Combs, Terry P.; Harrell, Joanne S.

In: Growth Hormone and IGF Research, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.04.2012, p. 87-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differences in the GH-IGF-I axis in children of different weight and fitness status

AU - Hosick, Peter

AU - McMurray, Robert G.

AU - Hackney, A. C.

AU - Battaglini, Claudio L.

AU - Combs, Terry P.

AU - Harrell, Joanne S.

PY - 2012/4/1

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N2 - Objective: To determine if differences in the GH-IGF-I axis exist between children of high and low aerobic fitness who are obese or of normal weight. Design: 124 children (ages 8-11) divided into four groups based on BMI and VO 2max (mL O 2/kg fat free mass(FFM)/min): normal weight - high-fit (NH), normal weight - low-fit (NL), obese - high-fit (OH), and obese - low-fit (OL). Height, weight, skinfolds, body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage and predicted VO 2max (both ml/kg/min and ml/kg FFM/min) were assessed. Resting growth hormone (GH), total insulin-like growth factor 1 (total IGF-I), free insulin-like growth factor 1(free IGF-I), and insulin were measured using morning fasting blood samples. Results: GH was greater in the NH group compared to the OL group only (p<0.01). No group differences existed for either total IGF-I (p=0.53) or free IGF-I (p=0.189). Insulin was greater in the OH and OL groups than the NH and NL groups (p<0.01). With groups combined (or overall), insulin and free IGF-I were related to fitness (insulin - ml/kg/min: r=-0.226, p<0.05 and ml/kg FFM/min: r=-0.212, p<0.05; free IGF-I - ml/kg/min: r=-0.219, p<0.01 and ml/kg FFM/min: r=-0.272, p<0.05). Conclusions: Fitness may contribute to the obesity related reduction of GH that may be involved with weight gain.

AB - Objective: To determine if differences in the GH-IGF-I axis exist between children of high and low aerobic fitness who are obese or of normal weight. Design: 124 children (ages 8-11) divided into four groups based on BMI and VO 2max (mL O 2/kg fat free mass(FFM)/min): normal weight - high-fit (NH), normal weight - low-fit (NL), obese - high-fit (OH), and obese - low-fit (OL). Height, weight, skinfolds, body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage and predicted VO 2max (both ml/kg/min and ml/kg FFM/min) were assessed. Resting growth hormone (GH), total insulin-like growth factor 1 (total IGF-I), free insulin-like growth factor 1(free IGF-I), and insulin were measured using morning fasting blood samples. Results: GH was greater in the NH group compared to the OL group only (p<0.01). No group differences existed for either total IGF-I (p=0.53) or free IGF-I (p=0.189). Insulin was greater in the OH and OL groups than the NH and NL groups (p<0.01). With groups combined (or overall), insulin and free IGF-I were related to fitness (insulin - ml/kg/min: r=-0.226, p<0.05 and ml/kg FFM/min: r=-0.212, p<0.05; free IGF-I - ml/kg/min: r=-0.219, p<0.01 and ml/kg FFM/min: r=-0.272, p<0.05). Conclusions: Fitness may contribute to the obesity related reduction of GH that may be involved with weight gain.

KW - Aerobic fitness

KW - Fat free mass

KW - Insulin

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