Diminished food resources are associated with delayed reproduction or increased post-reproductive mortality in brood-bearing terrestrial isopods Armadillidium vulgare Latreille

Scott Kight, Anaiseh Hashemi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Female terrestrial isopods (Crustacea: Oniscidea) carry eggs and early instars in a ventral brood pouch. We investigated reproductive expenditure of female Armadillidium vulgare Latreille under the condition of restricted food resources. Regardless of food availability, few cases of spontaneous termination of care were observed and most gravid females either successfully produced offspring or died while still bearing eggs. There were no differences in pre-hatching maternal mortality between food-restricted and non-restricted groups, but females exhibited significantly higher post-reproductive mortality when food availability was heavily reduced after oogenesis. This did not occur when food was restricted prior to oogenesis, but in this case females delayed the onset of reproduction. An association between mortality and past reproduction was further supported by high laboratory mortality, regardless of food availability, in non-gravid females field-captured late in the reproductive season. Maternal investment in A. vulgare thus appears to be energetically expensive. Despite the ability to terminate care, however, females continue to invest heavily in reproduction even when resources are scarce and the likelihood of mortality is high.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-68
Number of pages8
JournalEntomological News
Volume114
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2003

Fingerprint

Armadillidium vulgare
Isopoda
food availability
oogenesis
gravid females
pouches
breeding season
instars
hatching
Crustacea

Keywords

  • Armadillum vulgare
  • Brood-rearing
  • Delayed reproduction
  • Diminished food resources
  • Isopoda
  • Post-reproductive mortality

Cite this

@article{4c964e4bf1e64a819f726071c4c634e1,
title = "Diminished food resources are associated with delayed reproduction or increased post-reproductive mortality in brood-bearing terrestrial isopods Armadillidium vulgare Latreille",
abstract = "Female terrestrial isopods (Crustacea: Oniscidea) carry eggs and early instars in a ventral brood pouch. We investigated reproductive expenditure of female Armadillidium vulgare Latreille under the condition of restricted food resources. Regardless of food availability, few cases of spontaneous termination of care were observed and most gravid females either successfully produced offspring or died while still bearing eggs. There were no differences in pre-hatching maternal mortality between food-restricted and non-restricted groups, but females exhibited significantly higher post-reproductive mortality when food availability was heavily reduced after oogenesis. This did not occur when food was restricted prior to oogenesis, but in this case females delayed the onset of reproduction. An association between mortality and past reproduction was further supported by high laboratory mortality, regardless of food availability, in non-gravid females field-captured late in the reproductive season. Maternal investment in A. vulgare thus appears to be energetically expensive. Despite the ability to terminate care, however, females continue to invest heavily in reproduction even when resources are scarce and the likelihood of mortality is high.",
keywords = "Armadillum vulgare, Brood-rearing, Delayed reproduction, Diminished food resources, Isopoda, Post-reproductive mortality",
author = "Scott Kight and Anaiseh Hashemi",
year = "2003",
month = "3",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "114",
pages = "61--68",
journal = "Entomological News",
issn = "0013-872X",
publisher = "American Entomological Society",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diminished food resources are associated with delayed reproduction or increased post-reproductive mortality in brood-bearing terrestrial isopods Armadillidium vulgare Latreille

AU - Kight, Scott

AU - Hashemi, Anaiseh

PY - 2003/3/1

Y1 - 2003/3/1

N2 - Female terrestrial isopods (Crustacea: Oniscidea) carry eggs and early instars in a ventral brood pouch. We investigated reproductive expenditure of female Armadillidium vulgare Latreille under the condition of restricted food resources. Regardless of food availability, few cases of spontaneous termination of care were observed and most gravid females either successfully produced offspring or died while still bearing eggs. There were no differences in pre-hatching maternal mortality between food-restricted and non-restricted groups, but females exhibited significantly higher post-reproductive mortality when food availability was heavily reduced after oogenesis. This did not occur when food was restricted prior to oogenesis, but in this case females delayed the onset of reproduction. An association between mortality and past reproduction was further supported by high laboratory mortality, regardless of food availability, in non-gravid females field-captured late in the reproductive season. Maternal investment in A. vulgare thus appears to be energetically expensive. Despite the ability to terminate care, however, females continue to invest heavily in reproduction even when resources are scarce and the likelihood of mortality is high.

AB - Female terrestrial isopods (Crustacea: Oniscidea) carry eggs and early instars in a ventral brood pouch. We investigated reproductive expenditure of female Armadillidium vulgare Latreille under the condition of restricted food resources. Regardless of food availability, few cases of spontaneous termination of care were observed and most gravid females either successfully produced offspring or died while still bearing eggs. There were no differences in pre-hatching maternal mortality between food-restricted and non-restricted groups, but females exhibited significantly higher post-reproductive mortality when food availability was heavily reduced after oogenesis. This did not occur when food was restricted prior to oogenesis, but in this case females delayed the onset of reproduction. An association between mortality and past reproduction was further supported by high laboratory mortality, regardless of food availability, in non-gravid females field-captured late in the reproductive season. Maternal investment in A. vulgare thus appears to be energetically expensive. Despite the ability to terminate care, however, females continue to invest heavily in reproduction even when resources are scarce and the likelihood of mortality is high.

KW - Armadillum vulgare

KW - Brood-rearing

KW - Delayed reproduction

KW - Diminished food resources

KW - Isopoda

KW - Post-reproductive mortality

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=3042762903&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:3042762903

VL - 114

SP - 61

EP - 68

JO - Entomological News

JF - Entomological News

SN - 0013-872X

IS - 2

ER -