Disease persistence in epidemiological models: The interplay between vaccination and migration

Jackson Burton, Lora Billings, Derek A.T. Cummings, Ira B. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We consider the interplay of vaccination and migration rates on disease persistence in epidemiological systems. We show that short-term and long-term migration can inhibit disease persistence. As a result, we show how migration changes how vaccination rates should be chosen to maintain herd immunity. In a system of coupled SIR models, we analyze how disease eradication depends explicitly on vaccine distribution and migration connectivity. The analysis suggests potentially novel vaccination policies that underscore the importance of optimal placement of finite resources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-96
Number of pages6
JournalMathematical Biosciences
Volume239
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2012

Fingerprint

Epidemiological Model
Vaccination
Persistence
Migration
vaccination
Herd Immunity
Disease Eradication
Vaccines
SIR Model
Vaccine
Coupled Model
Immunity
vaccines
Placement
Connectivity
Resources

Keywords

  • Epidemics
  • Herd immunity
  • Migration
  • Vaccination

Cite this

Burton, Jackson ; Billings, Lora ; Cummings, Derek A.T. ; Schwartz, Ira B. / Disease persistence in epidemiological models : The interplay between vaccination and migration. In: Mathematical Biosciences. 2012 ; Vol. 239, No. 1. pp. 91-96.
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Disease persistence in epidemiological models : The interplay between vaccination and migration. / Burton, Jackson; Billings, Lora; Cummings, Derek A.T.; Schwartz, Ira B.

In: Mathematical Biosciences, Vol. 239, No. 1, 01.09.2012, p. 91-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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