Does First Sex Really “Just Happen?” A Retrospective Exploratory Study of Sexual Debut Among American Adolescents

Lisa Lieberman, Eva Goldfarb, Samantha Kwiatkowski, Paul Santos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

First sex marks a significant transition for most adolescents, yet teens often report that it was unplanned. Seventy-four college students participated in exploratory focus groups about their first sex. Although initially asked whether their first sex was spontaneous or planned, many participants revealed evidence of forethought or anticipation, signifying a third option, anticipation. This study suggests that the development and timing of sexual health messages should build on the apparent, albeit often unacknowledged, planning and thought that accompany the transition to first sex. Specifically, during the time immediately preceding first sex, young people might be particularly open to such messages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-256
Number of pages20
JournalAmerican Journal of Sexuality Education
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Jul 2017

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adolescent
planning
health
evidence
Group
student
time

Keywords

  • Gender
  • qualitative methods
  • romantic relationships
  • sexual debut
  • sexuality

Cite this

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Does First Sex Really “Just Happen?” A Retrospective Exploratory Study of Sexual Debut Among American Adolescents. / Lieberman, Lisa; Goldfarb, Eva; Kwiatkowski, Samantha; Santos, Paul.

In: American Journal of Sexuality Education, Vol. 12, No. 3, 03.07.2017, p. 237-256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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