Dynamics of sediment and contaminant transport in the Hudson River estuary: Evidence from sediment distributions of naturally occurring radionuclides

D. J. Hirschberg, P. Chin, Huan Feng, J. K. Cochran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Near surface (< 10 cm) sediment distributions of 234Th sampled multiple times at five locations along the axis of the Hudson Estuary from the Upper Bay of New York to Haverstraw Bay are compared with 210Pb data from longer cores at the same locations. The comparison indicates that while there is little net sediment accumulation anywhere except at one location in the Upper Bay, near surface sediment in this reach of the estuary is mobile on short (months) time scales. The sediment appears to be physically mixed rather than bioturbated. Comparison of the sediment inventories of 234Th with calculated water column production indicates short time scale (months) variability in 234Th deposition. Some parts of the bottom have 234Th inventories in excess of local production but these appear to be balanced by 234Th deficient area, resulting in a general equilibrium. Sediment inventories of Pb, Cu, and Zn normalized to 210Pb show no evidence of a uniquely urban source of these metals to the lower estuary. Silver distributions in sediment indicate a possible source of silver from New York City, probably related to sewage inputs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)931-949
Number of pages19
JournalEstuaries
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1996

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Hudson River
Estuaries
pollutant transport
radionuclides
Radioisotopes
sediment transport
radionuclide
Sediments
estuaries
Rivers
estuary
Impurities
sediments
river
sediment
Silver
silver
timescale
Sewage
distribution

Cite this

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abstract = "Near surface (< 10 cm) sediment distributions of 234Th sampled multiple times at five locations along the axis of the Hudson Estuary from the Upper Bay of New York to Haverstraw Bay are compared with 210Pb data from longer cores at the same locations. The comparison indicates that while there is little net sediment accumulation anywhere except at one location in the Upper Bay, near surface sediment in this reach of the estuary is mobile on short (months) time scales. The sediment appears to be physically mixed rather than bioturbated. Comparison of the sediment inventories of 234Th with calculated water column production indicates short time scale (months) variability in 234Th deposition. Some parts of the bottom have 234Th inventories in excess of local production but these appear to be balanced by 234Th deficient area, resulting in a general equilibrium. Sediment inventories of Pb, Cu, and Zn normalized to 210Pb show no evidence of a uniquely urban source of these metals to the lower estuary. Silver distributions in sediment indicate a possible source of silver from New York City, probably related to sewage inputs.",
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Dynamics of sediment and contaminant transport in the Hudson River estuary : Evidence from sediment distributions of naturally occurring radionuclides. / Hirschberg, D. J.; Chin, P.; Feng, Huan; Cochran, J. K.

In: Estuaries, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.01.1996, p. 931-949.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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