Early Gender Differences in Self-Regulation and Academic Achievement

Jamaal Matthews, Claire Cameron Ponitz, Frederick J. Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

267 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined gender differences in self-regulation in the fall and spring of kindergarten and their connection to gender differences in 5 areas of early achievement: applied problems (math), general knowledge, letter-word identification, expressive vocabulary, and sound awareness. Behavioral self-regulation was measured using both an objective direct measure (N = 268; Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders task) and, for a subsample of children, a teacher report of classroom self-regulatory behavior (n = 156; Child Behavior Rating Scale). Results showed that girls outperformed boys in both assessments. Although gender differences in self-regulation were clear, no significant gender differences were found on the 5 academic achievement outcomes, as measured by the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement. Self-regulation consistently predicted math and sound awareness, although links were stronger with the direct measure as compared with teacher reports. Implications for understanding the role of gender and self-regulation in early and later academic achievement and the role of self-regulation in particular areas of achievement are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)689-704
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume101
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2009

Fingerprint

self-regulation
academic achievement
gender-specific factors
Vocabulary
Child Behavior
Toes
teacher
rating scale
kindergarten
Self Report
Self-Control
vocabulary
Knee
Head
classroom
gender

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • behavioral self-regulation
  • gender differences
  • kindergarten
  • structured observational assessment

Cite this

Matthews, Jamaal ; Ponitz, Claire Cameron ; Morrison, Frederick J. / Early Gender Differences in Self-Regulation and Academic Achievement. In: Journal of Educational Psychology. 2009 ; Vol. 101, No. 3. pp. 689-704.
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Early Gender Differences in Self-Regulation and Academic Achievement. / Matthews, Jamaal; Ponitz, Claire Cameron; Morrison, Frederick J.

In: Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 101, No. 3, 01.08.2009, p. 689-704.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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