Efficient coding of eyewitness narratives: A comparison of syntactic unit and word count procedures

Jason Dickinson, Debra A. Poole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Researchers rely on two types of coding systems to evaluate eyewitness narratives. Features-of-events checklists offer coding simplicity but are impractical when target events are complex. Units-of-information (UOI) systems score all information reported, regardless of event complexity, but are difficult to implement. To test whether simpler systems would alter conclusions about memory performance, transcripts from children (3-8 years of age) who participated in an eyewitness study, originally coded using a UOI system called syntactic units (SU), were recoded using two word count procedures. Correlations between SU, modified word count, and raw word count values were high, and the proportion of information that was inaccurate was comparable across systems. Considering their high interrater reliability, procedural simplicity, and convergence with SU coding, word count procedures are efficient alternatives to UOI coding.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)537-545
Number of pages9
JournalBehavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2000

Fingerprint

Information Systems
Checklist
Research Personnel

Cite this

@article{97ac264f4d1849f0a0745cd803a011ed,
title = "Efficient coding of eyewitness narratives: A comparison of syntactic unit and word count procedures",
abstract = "Researchers rely on two types of coding systems to evaluate eyewitness narratives. Features-of-events checklists offer coding simplicity but are impractical when target events are complex. Units-of-information (UOI) systems score all information reported, regardless of event complexity, but are difficult to implement. To test whether simpler systems would alter conclusions about memory performance, transcripts from children (3-8 years of age) who participated in an eyewitness study, originally coded using a UOI system called syntactic units (SU), were recoded using two word count procedures. Correlations between SU, modified word count, and raw word count values were high, and the proportion of information that was inaccurate was comparable across systems. Considering their high interrater reliability, procedural simplicity, and convergence with SU coding, word count procedures are efficient alternatives to UOI coding.",
author = "Jason Dickinson and Poole, {Debra A.}",
year = "2000",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3758/BF03200826",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "537--545",
journal = "Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers",
issn = "0743-3808",
publisher = "Psychonomic Society Inc.",
number = "4",

}

Efficient coding of eyewitness narratives : A comparison of syntactic unit and word count procedures. / Dickinson, Jason; Poole, Debra A.

In: Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers, Vol. 32, No. 4, 01.01.2000, p. 537-545.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Efficient coding of eyewitness narratives

T2 - A comparison of syntactic unit and word count procedures

AU - Dickinson, Jason

AU - Poole, Debra A.

PY - 2000/1/1

Y1 - 2000/1/1

N2 - Researchers rely on two types of coding systems to evaluate eyewitness narratives. Features-of-events checklists offer coding simplicity but are impractical when target events are complex. Units-of-information (UOI) systems score all information reported, regardless of event complexity, but are difficult to implement. To test whether simpler systems would alter conclusions about memory performance, transcripts from children (3-8 years of age) who participated in an eyewitness study, originally coded using a UOI system called syntactic units (SU), were recoded using two word count procedures. Correlations between SU, modified word count, and raw word count values were high, and the proportion of information that was inaccurate was comparable across systems. Considering their high interrater reliability, procedural simplicity, and convergence with SU coding, word count procedures are efficient alternatives to UOI coding.

AB - Researchers rely on two types of coding systems to evaluate eyewitness narratives. Features-of-events checklists offer coding simplicity but are impractical when target events are complex. Units-of-information (UOI) systems score all information reported, regardless of event complexity, but are difficult to implement. To test whether simpler systems would alter conclusions about memory performance, transcripts from children (3-8 years of age) who participated in an eyewitness study, originally coded using a UOI system called syntactic units (SU), were recoded using two word count procedures. Correlations between SU, modified word count, and raw word count values were high, and the proportion of information that was inaccurate was comparable across systems. Considering their high interrater reliability, procedural simplicity, and convergence with SU coding, word count procedures are efficient alternatives to UOI coding.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034331739&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3758/BF03200826

DO - 10.3758/BF03200826

M3 - Article

C2 - 11189854

AN - SCOPUS:0034331739

VL - 32

SP - 537

EP - 545

JO - Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers

JF - Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers

SN - 0743-3808

IS - 4

ER -