Employer-Based Programs to Support Breastfeeding among Working Mothers

A Systematic Review

Lauren Dinour, Jacalyn M. Szaro

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Many mothers experience barriers to maintaining a breastfeeding relationship with their infants upon returning to work and, consequently, terminate breastfeeding earlier than recommended or intended. As such, employers are in a unique position to help further increase breastfeeding rates, durations, and exclusivity. Objective: The purpose of this review is to examine the literature regarding employer-based programs, policies, and interventions to support breastfeeding among working mothers. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published before April 2016. Studies were included if they focused on workplace-based lactation/breastfeeding support programs, policies, or interventions to promote breastfeeding among employees. For inclusion, articles must have measured at least one outcome, such as breastfeeding duration, breastfeeding exclusivity, or employee satisfaction. Results: Twenty-two articles were included, representing 10 different countries and both public- and private-sector employers, including governmental offices, schools, hospitals, manufacturing/industrial companies, and financial settings, among others. Providing a lactation space was the most common employer-based support accommodation studied, followed by breastfeeding breaks and comprehensive lactation support programs. The majority of studies analyzing these three support types found at least one positive breastfeeding and/or nonbreastfeeding outcome. Conclusions: This review suggests that maintaining breastfeeding while working is not only possible but also more likely when employers provide the supports that women need to do so. Although some employers may have more extensive breastfeeding support policies and practices than others, all employers can implement a breastfeeding support program that fits their company's budget and resources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-141
Number of pages11
JournalBreastfeeding Medicine
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2017

Fingerprint

Breast Feeding
Mothers
Lactation
Private Sector
Public Sector
Budgets
Workplace

Keywords

  • breast milk expression
  • breastfeeding duration
  • breastfeeding initiation
  • employer
  • support
  • workplace

Cite this

@article{5a9db9662f1644ea97181a9e741a9f8e,
title = "Employer-Based Programs to Support Breastfeeding among Working Mothers: A Systematic Review",
abstract = "Background: Many mothers experience barriers to maintaining a breastfeeding relationship with their infants upon returning to work and, consequently, terminate breastfeeding earlier than recommended or intended. As such, employers are in a unique position to help further increase breastfeeding rates, durations, and exclusivity. Objective: The purpose of this review is to examine the literature regarding employer-based programs, policies, and interventions to support breastfeeding among working mothers. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published before April 2016. Studies were included if they focused on workplace-based lactation/breastfeeding support programs, policies, or interventions to promote breastfeeding among employees. For inclusion, articles must have measured at least one outcome, such as breastfeeding duration, breastfeeding exclusivity, or employee satisfaction. Results: Twenty-two articles were included, representing 10 different countries and both public- and private-sector employers, including governmental offices, schools, hospitals, manufacturing/industrial companies, and financial settings, among others. Providing a lactation space was the most common employer-based support accommodation studied, followed by breastfeeding breaks and comprehensive lactation support programs. The majority of studies analyzing these three support types found at least one positive breastfeeding and/or nonbreastfeeding outcome. Conclusions: This review suggests that maintaining breastfeeding while working is not only possible but also more likely when employers provide the supports that women need to do so. Although some employers may have more extensive breastfeeding support policies and practices than others, all employers can implement a breastfeeding support program that fits their company's budget and resources.",
keywords = "breast milk expression, breastfeeding duration, breastfeeding initiation, employer, support, workplace",
author = "Lauren Dinour and Szaro, {Jacalyn M.}",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/bfm.2016.0182",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "131--141",
journal = "Breastfeeding Medicine",
issn = "1556-8253",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Employer-Based Programs to Support Breastfeeding among Working Mothers : A Systematic Review. / Dinour, Lauren; Szaro, Jacalyn M.

In: Breastfeeding Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.04.2017, p. 131-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Employer-Based Programs to Support Breastfeeding among Working Mothers

T2 - A Systematic Review

AU - Dinour, Lauren

AU - Szaro, Jacalyn M.

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - Background: Many mothers experience barriers to maintaining a breastfeeding relationship with their infants upon returning to work and, consequently, terminate breastfeeding earlier than recommended or intended. As such, employers are in a unique position to help further increase breastfeeding rates, durations, and exclusivity. Objective: The purpose of this review is to examine the literature regarding employer-based programs, policies, and interventions to support breastfeeding among working mothers. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published before April 2016. Studies were included if they focused on workplace-based lactation/breastfeeding support programs, policies, or interventions to promote breastfeeding among employees. For inclusion, articles must have measured at least one outcome, such as breastfeeding duration, breastfeeding exclusivity, or employee satisfaction. Results: Twenty-two articles were included, representing 10 different countries and both public- and private-sector employers, including governmental offices, schools, hospitals, manufacturing/industrial companies, and financial settings, among others. Providing a lactation space was the most common employer-based support accommodation studied, followed by breastfeeding breaks and comprehensive lactation support programs. The majority of studies analyzing these three support types found at least one positive breastfeeding and/or nonbreastfeeding outcome. Conclusions: This review suggests that maintaining breastfeeding while working is not only possible but also more likely when employers provide the supports that women need to do so. Although some employers may have more extensive breastfeeding support policies and practices than others, all employers can implement a breastfeeding support program that fits their company's budget and resources.

AB - Background: Many mothers experience barriers to maintaining a breastfeeding relationship with their infants upon returning to work and, consequently, terminate breastfeeding earlier than recommended or intended. As such, employers are in a unique position to help further increase breastfeeding rates, durations, and exclusivity. Objective: The purpose of this review is to examine the literature regarding employer-based programs, policies, and interventions to support breastfeeding among working mothers. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published before April 2016. Studies were included if they focused on workplace-based lactation/breastfeeding support programs, policies, or interventions to promote breastfeeding among employees. For inclusion, articles must have measured at least one outcome, such as breastfeeding duration, breastfeeding exclusivity, or employee satisfaction. Results: Twenty-two articles were included, representing 10 different countries and both public- and private-sector employers, including governmental offices, schools, hospitals, manufacturing/industrial companies, and financial settings, among others. Providing a lactation space was the most common employer-based support accommodation studied, followed by breastfeeding breaks and comprehensive lactation support programs. The majority of studies analyzing these three support types found at least one positive breastfeeding and/or nonbreastfeeding outcome. Conclusions: This review suggests that maintaining breastfeeding while working is not only possible but also more likely when employers provide the supports that women need to do so. Although some employers may have more extensive breastfeeding support policies and practices than others, all employers can implement a breastfeeding support program that fits their company's budget and resources.

KW - breast milk expression

KW - breastfeeding duration

KW - breastfeeding initiation

KW - employer

KW - support

KW - workplace

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85017392473&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/bfm.2016.0182

DO - 10.1089/bfm.2016.0182

M3 - Review article

VL - 12

SP - 131

EP - 141

JO - Breastfeeding Medicine

JF - Breastfeeding Medicine

SN - 1556-8253

IS - 3

ER -