Engineering management education - Technology integration, manufacturing, or the management of engineers and scientists?

John V. Farr, Brian J. Sauser, Rashmi Jain, Dinesh Verma

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The content of Engineering Management (EM) educational programs has evolved significantly in the last five years. Many of the traditional EM departments have adopted systems engineering (SE) in their titles and have started systems engineering programs as part of their educational offerings. Subsequently, in many of the academic programs EM content has shifted from the combination of management of engineers and scientists within a traditional industrial engineering framework to one with a curriculum emphasizing the integration of management, human, and technology (i.e., systems) issues. The objective of all EM programs is to produce graduates who can work effectively at the interface between technology, management, and engineering. We believe that a systems engineering focus is a key component of the core curriculum for all EM programs. This paper attempts to present the market forces driving this change and presents an analysis of several large EM programs that have significant SE content. We hope that the ideas presented in this paper will be used in curriculum development for EM programs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation
Subtitle of host publicationOpportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005
Pages171-175
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2005
Event26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005 - Virginia Beach, VA, United States
Duration: 26 Oct 200529 Oct 2005

Publication series

Name26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005

Other

Other26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005
CountryUnited States
CityVirginia Beach, VA
Period26/10/0529/10/05

Fingerprint

Technology integration
Management education
Engineering management
Manufacturing
Engineers
Systems engineering
Curriculum
Education
Technology system
Market forces
Industrial engineering
Curriculum development
Technology management

Cite this

Farr, J. V., Sauser, B. J., Jain, R., & Verma, D. (2005). Engineering management education - Technology integration, manufacturing, or the management of engineers and scientists? In 26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005 (pp. 171-175). (26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005).
Farr, John V. ; Sauser, Brian J. ; Jain, Rashmi ; Verma, Dinesh. / Engineering management education - Technology integration, manufacturing, or the management of engineers and scientists?. 26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005. 2005. pp. 171-175 (26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005).
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abstract = "The content of Engineering Management (EM) educational programs has evolved significantly in the last five years. Many of the traditional EM departments have adopted systems engineering (SE) in their titles and have started systems engineering programs as part of their educational offerings. Subsequently, in many of the academic programs EM content has shifted from the combination of management of engineers and scientists within a traditional industrial engineering framework to one with a curriculum emphasizing the integration of management, human, and technology (i.e., systems) issues. The objective of all EM programs is to produce graduates who can work effectively at the interface between technology, management, and engineering. We believe that a systems engineering focus is a key component of the core curriculum for all EM programs. This paper attempts to present the market forces driving this change and presents an analysis of several large EM programs that have significant SE content. We hope that the ideas presented in this paper will be used in curriculum development for EM programs.",
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Farr, JV, Sauser, BJ, Jain, R & Verma, D 2005, Engineering management education - Technology integration, manufacturing, or the management of engineers and scientists? in 26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005. 26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005, pp. 171-175, 26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005, Virginia Beach, VA, United States, 26/10/05.

Engineering management education - Technology integration, manufacturing, or the management of engineers and scientists? / Farr, John V.; Sauser, Brian J.; Jain, Rashmi; Verma, Dinesh.

26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005. 2005. p. 171-175 (26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Farr JV, Sauser BJ, Jain R, Verma D. Engineering management education - Technology integration, manufacturing, or the management of engineers and scientists? In 26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005. 2005. p. 171-175. (26th Annual National Conference of the American Society for Engineering Management 2005 - Organizational Transformation: Opportunities and Challenges, ASEM 2005).