Exploring Service Provider Perceptions of Treatment Barriers Facing Black, Non-Gay-Identified MSMW

Bradley Forenza, Ellen Benoit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non-gay-identified men who have sex with men and women and who use alcohol and other drugs are a vulnerable population. Little is known about health and medical service provider interaction with these underserved clients. This article presents a thematic analysis of two focus groups undertaken with social and medical service providers regarding the needs of non-gay-identified men who have sex with men and women. Four emergent themes (labeling, constructions of masculinity, HIV/AIDS awareness, and treatment success) illustrate perceived barriers to HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment, as well as treatment success. Implications for policy, practice, and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)114-129
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Apr 2016

Fingerprint

service provider
medical service
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
HIV
Masculinity
Vulnerable Populations
Therapeutics
Focus Groups
Social Work
masculinity
Health Services
alcohol
Alcohols
drug
interaction
health
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Group

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • men who have sex with men and women
  • prevention services
  • stigma

Cite this

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Exploring Service Provider Perceptions of Treatment Barriers Facing Black, Non-Gay-Identified MSMW. / Forenza, Bradley; Benoit, Ellen.

In: Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work, Vol. 25, No. 2, 02.04.2016, p. 114-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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