Exposure to media violence and young children with and without disabilities

Powerful opportunities for family-professional partnerships

Elizabeth Erwin, Naomi Morton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is growing concern regarding the amount and type of violence that young children are exposed to on a daily basis. Through media, popular toys and video games violent images are consistently present in children's lives starting at a very young age. This paper discusses (a) the growing presence of young children's exposure to media violence, (b) the influence of media violence on early childhood development and well-being, (c) the impact of media violence on young children with disabilities, and (d) recommendations for addressing this national dilemma within the context of family-professional partnerships. A list of related web resources is also included.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-112
Number of pages8
JournalEarly Childhood Education Journal
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2008

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Disabled Children
Violence
disability
violence
Video Games
Play and Playthings
toy
computer game
well-being
childhood
Exposure to Violence
resources

Keywords

  • Early childhood
  • Family-professional partnerships
  • Media violence
  • Television and screen activities
  • Young children with disabilities

Cite this

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Exposure to media violence and young children with and without disabilities : Powerful opportunities for family-professional partnerships. / Erwin, Elizabeth; Morton, Naomi.

In: Early Childhood Education Journal, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.10.2008, p. 105-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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