Factors associated with reunification: A longitudinal analysis of long-term foster care

Tyrone Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Longitudinal analysis and a secondary sample of 411 children were used to examine how child welfare worker engagement with families and parent receipt of needed services shaped the outcomes for children in long-term foster care. The data came from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being. Multinomial logistic regression showed reunification to be likeliest for neglected children who had caseworkers deeply involved with their families; whose families needed housing and financial assistance but not domestic violence services, specifically; and who were provided appropriately matched services. Adoption was likeliest for neglected children who had caseworkers deeply involved with their families; whose families needed substance-abuse services but not housing services; whose families had a high risk of re-reporting; whose parents were married; who were White and relatively young; and who had experienced foster care for relatively longer periods. Implications for services and training are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1311-1316
Number of pages6
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2010

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