Factors leading African Americans and black caribbeans to use social work services for treating mental and substance use disorders

Tyrone Cheng, Michael A. Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This secondary analysis of 5,000 African Americans and black Caribbeans explored how their use of social work services to address mental and substance use disorders was associated with the disorder involved as well as their perceived need for services, belief system, family resources, proximity to services, social-structural factors, and demographic characteristics. The sample was extracted from a national data set. Results of multinomial logistic regression showed that use of social work services was increased by dual diagnosis, substance use disorder alone, and mental disorder alone; by deteriorating mental health; by perceived stigma in treatment use; by welfare receipt and insurance coverage for mental health services; and by college graduation. Results also showed that use of services outside social work was promoted by dual diagnosis, substance use disorder alone, and mental disorder alone; by deteriorating mental health; by experience of racial discrimination; by insurance coverage for mental health services; by college education or graduation; and by female gender and increasing age. The findings' implications for social work intervention and education are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-109
Number of pages11
JournalHealth and Social Work
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2013

Fingerprint

Social Work
African Americans
Substance-Related Disorders
social work
mental health
insurance coverage
mental disorder
health service
Dual (Psychiatry) Diagnosis
Insurance Coverage
Mental Health Services
Mental Disorders
secondary analysis
Mental Health
mobile social services
racism
education
welfare
Education
logistics

Keywords

  • mental health
  • racial disparities
  • social work practice
  • substance abuse

Cite this

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Factors leading African Americans and black caribbeans to use social work services for treating mental and substance use disorders. / Cheng, Tyrone; Robinson, Michael A.

In: Health and Social Work, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.05.2013, p. 99-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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