Finding common ground

Birds, biodiversity, and the implications for collaboration with traditional landowners in New Guinea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been proposed that indigenous societies can be models for the conservation of biodiversity. However, attempts at implementing conservation-based development plans are being judged failures. In this article, I argue that these failures can be addressed by translating indigenous knowledge into context that is mutually intelligible to both indigenous people and conservation biologists. Drawing on sixteen months of ethnobiological fieldwork, this article uses indigenous knowledge to describe the relationship of traditional life to biodiversity for the Hewa of Papua New Guinea's Central Range. The island of New Guinea is one of the planet's last bastions of cultural and biological diversity. Using birds as an indicator of diversity, I argue that more productive conservation policies will emerge when indigenous activities are viewed not as vehicles for establishing equilibrium with the environment, but as a source of ecological disturbance. Although Hewa traditions currently play a significant role in shaping this biologically diverse environment, their lifestyle is not necessarily a template for sustainability in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-92
Number of pages11
JournalEnvironmental Management
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2010

Fingerprint

Biodiversity
Birds
landowner
indigenous knowledge
Conservation
biodiversity
bird
lifestyle
fieldwork
Planets
planet
sustainability
disturbance
Sustainable development

Keywords

  • Birds
  • Conservation
  • Disturbance
  • Indigenous knowledge
  • New Guinea

Cite this

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Finding common ground : Birds, biodiversity, and the implications for collaboration with traditional landowners in New Guinea. / Thomas, William.

In: Environmental Management, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 82-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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