Hypnotic susceptibility, imaging ability, and anagram-solving activity

Benjamin Wallace, Philip A. Allen, Ruth Propper

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anagram-solving activity was examined as a function of hypnotic susceptibility level and imaging ability. In Experiment 1, anagrams that were composed of sets of letters that formed actual words (word anagrams), but when unscrambled formed other words, were compared to sets of letters that formed nonwords (nonsense anagrams). Word anagrams required more time to solve than nonsense anagrams. Also, fewer word anagrams were correctly solved compared to nonsense anagrams. Those individuals judged both high in hypnotic susceptibility and vivid in imaging ability demonstrated the best performance. In Experiment 2, anagrams that when unscrambled formed high- imagery words were compared to those that formed low-imagery words. High- imagery-word anagrams were solved more quickly and correctly than low- imagery-word anagrams. Such activity was best demonstrated by individuals who were judged to be both high in hypnotic susceptibility and vivid in imaging ability. These results are discussed in terms of strategies for solving anagrams and the individual differences that appear to be associated with using such strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)324-337
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1996

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Aptitude
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Individuality

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Hypnotic susceptibility, imaging ability, and anagram-solving activity. / Wallace, Benjamin; Allen, Philip A.; Propper, Ruth.

In: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.01.1996, p. 324-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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