Immediate and Longer-Term Stressors and the Mental Health of Hurricane Ike Survivors

Sarah Lowe, Melissa Tracy, Magdalena Cerdá, Fran H. Norris, Sandro Galea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research has documented that individuals exposed to more stressors during disasters and their immediate aftermath (immediate stressors) are at risk of experiencing longer-term postdisaster stressors. Longer-term stressors, in turn, have been found to play a key role in shaping postdisaster psychological functioning. Few studies have simultaneously explored the links from immediate to longer-term stressors, and from longer-term stressors to psychological functioning, however. Additionally, studies have inadequately explored whether postdisaster psychological symptoms influence longer-term stressors. In the current study, we aimed to fill these gaps. Participants (N = 448) were from population-based study of Hurricane Ike survivors and completed assessments 2-5 months (Wave 1), 5-9 months (Wave 2) and 14-18 months (Wave 3) postdisaster. Through path analysis, we found that immediate stressors, assessed at Wave 1, were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 stressors, which in turn were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms. Wave 2 posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with Wave 3 stressors, and Wave 1 depressive symptoms were positively associated with Wave 2 stressors. The findings suggest that policies and interventions can reduce the impact of disasters on mental health by preventing and alleviating both immediate and longer-term postdisaster stressors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)753-761
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Cyclonic Storms
Survivors
Mental Health
Disasters
Psychology
Depression
Research
Population

Cite this

Lowe, Sarah ; Tracy, Melissa ; Cerdá, Magdalena ; Norris, Fran H. ; Galea, Sandro. / Immediate and Longer-Term Stressors and the Mental Health of Hurricane Ike Survivors. In: Journal of Traumatic Stress. 2013 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 753-761.
@article{4ce97662b47b4130960759a52f28e078,
title = "Immediate and Longer-Term Stressors and the Mental Health of Hurricane Ike Survivors",
abstract = "Previous research has documented that individuals exposed to more stressors during disasters and their immediate aftermath (immediate stressors) are at risk of experiencing longer-term postdisaster stressors. Longer-term stressors, in turn, have been found to play a key role in shaping postdisaster psychological functioning. Few studies have simultaneously explored the links from immediate to longer-term stressors, and from longer-term stressors to psychological functioning, however. Additionally, studies have inadequately explored whether postdisaster psychological symptoms influence longer-term stressors. In the current study, we aimed to fill these gaps. Participants (N = 448) were from population-based study of Hurricane Ike survivors and completed assessments 2-5 months (Wave 1), 5-9 months (Wave 2) and 14-18 months (Wave 3) postdisaster. Through path analysis, we found that immediate stressors, assessed at Wave 1, were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 stressors, which in turn were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms. Wave 2 posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with Wave 3 stressors, and Wave 1 depressive symptoms were positively associated with Wave 2 stressors. The findings suggest that policies and interventions can reduce the impact of disasters on mental health by preventing and alleviating both immediate and longer-term postdisaster stressors.",
author = "Sarah Lowe and Melissa Tracy and Magdalena Cerd{\'a} and Norris, {Fran H.} and Sandro Galea",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jts.21872",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "753--761",
journal = "Journal of traumatic stress",
issn = "0894-9867",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

Immediate and Longer-Term Stressors and the Mental Health of Hurricane Ike Survivors. / Lowe, Sarah; Tracy, Melissa; Cerdá, Magdalena; Norris, Fran H.; Galea, Sandro.

In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, Vol. 26, No. 6, 01.12.2013, p. 753-761.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Immediate and Longer-Term Stressors and the Mental Health of Hurricane Ike Survivors

AU - Lowe, Sarah

AU - Tracy, Melissa

AU - Cerdá, Magdalena

AU - Norris, Fran H.

AU - Galea, Sandro

PY - 2013/12/1

Y1 - 2013/12/1

N2 - Previous research has documented that individuals exposed to more stressors during disasters and their immediate aftermath (immediate stressors) are at risk of experiencing longer-term postdisaster stressors. Longer-term stressors, in turn, have been found to play a key role in shaping postdisaster psychological functioning. Few studies have simultaneously explored the links from immediate to longer-term stressors, and from longer-term stressors to psychological functioning, however. Additionally, studies have inadequately explored whether postdisaster psychological symptoms influence longer-term stressors. In the current study, we aimed to fill these gaps. Participants (N = 448) were from population-based study of Hurricane Ike survivors and completed assessments 2-5 months (Wave 1), 5-9 months (Wave 2) and 14-18 months (Wave 3) postdisaster. Through path analysis, we found that immediate stressors, assessed at Wave 1, were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 stressors, which in turn were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms. Wave 2 posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with Wave 3 stressors, and Wave 1 depressive symptoms were positively associated with Wave 2 stressors. The findings suggest that policies and interventions can reduce the impact of disasters on mental health by preventing and alleviating both immediate and longer-term postdisaster stressors.

AB - Previous research has documented that individuals exposed to more stressors during disasters and their immediate aftermath (immediate stressors) are at risk of experiencing longer-term postdisaster stressors. Longer-term stressors, in turn, have been found to play a key role in shaping postdisaster psychological functioning. Few studies have simultaneously explored the links from immediate to longer-term stressors, and from longer-term stressors to psychological functioning, however. Additionally, studies have inadequately explored whether postdisaster psychological symptoms influence longer-term stressors. In the current study, we aimed to fill these gaps. Participants (N = 448) were from population-based study of Hurricane Ike survivors and completed assessments 2-5 months (Wave 1), 5-9 months (Wave 2) and 14-18 months (Wave 3) postdisaster. Through path analysis, we found that immediate stressors, assessed at Wave 1, were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 stressors, which in turn were positively associated with Wave 2 and Wave 3 posttraumatic stress and depressive symptoms. Wave 2 posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with Wave 3 stressors, and Wave 1 depressive symptoms were positively associated with Wave 2 stressors. The findings suggest that policies and interventions can reduce the impact of disasters on mental health by preventing and alleviating both immediate and longer-term postdisaster stressors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84890365295&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jts.21872

DO - 10.1002/jts.21872

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 753

EP - 761

JO - Journal of traumatic stress

JF - Journal of traumatic stress

SN - 0894-9867

IS - 6

ER -