Innovations in Practice

The relationship between sleep disturbances, depression, and interpersonal functioning in treatment for adolescent depression

Eleanor L. McGlinchey, Jazmin Reyes-Portillo, J. Blake Turner, Laura Mufson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Sleep disturbance is frequently comorbid with depression and sleep complaints are the most common residual symptoms after treatment among adolescents with depression. The present analyses investigated the effect of sleep disturbance in depressed adolescents treated with interpersonal psychotherapy for adolescents (IPT-A) versus treatment as usual (TAU) in school-based mental health clinics. Method: Sixty-three adolescents participated in a randomized clinical trial of IPT-A versus TAU for adolescent depression. Participants were diagnosed with a DSM-IV depressive disorder and assessed for symptoms of depression, interpersonal functioning, and sleep disturbance. Measures were assessed at baseline, session 4 and 8 of treatment, and session 12 for postacute treatment follow-up. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to model change in depression, interpersonal functioning, and sleep disturbance. Results: Ongoing sleep disturbance was significantly associated with worse depression scores as rated by clinician (γ = 1.04, SE =.22, p <.001) and self-report (γ = 1.63, SE =.29, p <.001), as well as worse interpersonal functioning across the course of treatment (γ = 0.09, SE =.02, p <.001). Treatment condition did not predict change in sleep disturbance (γ = −0.13, SE =.14, p = ns). Conclusions: For all patients in the study, sleep disturbance was a predictor of depression and interpersonal functioning for depressed adolescents. Sleep disturbance predicted more depression and interpersonal stress across treatments and led to a slower improvement in depression and interpersonal functioning. These data suggest that sleep disturbance should be a target for future treatment development research among depressed adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-99
Number of pages4
JournalChild and Adolescent Mental Health
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2017

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Sleep
Depression
Therapeutics
Psychotherapy
Depressive Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Self Report
Mental Health
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research

Keywords

  • Depression
  • adolescent
  • child
  • clinical trials
  • sleep disorders
  • treatment

Cite this

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title = "Innovations in Practice: The relationship between sleep disturbances, depression, and interpersonal functioning in treatment for adolescent depression",
abstract = "Background: Sleep disturbance is frequently comorbid with depression and sleep complaints are the most common residual symptoms after treatment among adolescents with depression. The present analyses investigated the effect of sleep disturbance in depressed adolescents treated with interpersonal psychotherapy for adolescents (IPT-A) versus treatment as usual (TAU) in school-based mental health clinics. Method: Sixty-three adolescents participated in a randomized clinical trial of IPT-A versus TAU for adolescent depression. Participants were diagnosed with a DSM-IV depressive disorder and assessed for symptoms of depression, interpersonal functioning, and sleep disturbance. Measures were assessed at baseline, session 4 and 8 of treatment, and session 12 for postacute treatment follow-up. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to model change in depression, interpersonal functioning, and sleep disturbance. Results: Ongoing sleep disturbance was significantly associated with worse depression scores as rated by clinician (γ = 1.04, SE =.22, p <.001) and self-report (γ = 1.63, SE =.29, p <.001), as well as worse interpersonal functioning across the course of treatment (γ = 0.09, SE =.02, p <.001). Treatment condition did not predict change in sleep disturbance (γ = −0.13, SE =.14, p = ns). Conclusions: For all patients in the study, sleep disturbance was a predictor of depression and interpersonal functioning for depressed adolescents. Sleep disturbance predicted more depression and interpersonal stress across treatments and led to a slower improvement in depression and interpersonal functioning. These data suggest that sleep disturbance should be a target for future treatment development research among depressed adolescents.",
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Innovations in Practice : The relationship between sleep disturbances, depression, and interpersonal functioning in treatment for adolescent depression. / McGlinchey, Eleanor L.; Reyes-Portillo, Jazmin; Turner, J. Blake; Mufson, Laura.

In: Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.05.2017, p. 96-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Innovations in Practice

T2 - The relationship between sleep disturbances, depression, and interpersonal functioning in treatment for adolescent depression

AU - McGlinchey, Eleanor L.

AU - Reyes-Portillo, Jazmin

AU - Turner, J. Blake

AU - Mufson, Laura

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - Background: Sleep disturbance is frequently comorbid with depression and sleep complaints are the most common residual symptoms after treatment among adolescents with depression. The present analyses investigated the effect of sleep disturbance in depressed adolescents treated with interpersonal psychotherapy for adolescents (IPT-A) versus treatment as usual (TAU) in school-based mental health clinics. Method: Sixty-three adolescents participated in a randomized clinical trial of IPT-A versus TAU for adolescent depression. Participants were diagnosed with a DSM-IV depressive disorder and assessed for symptoms of depression, interpersonal functioning, and sleep disturbance. Measures were assessed at baseline, session 4 and 8 of treatment, and session 12 for postacute treatment follow-up. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to model change in depression, interpersonal functioning, and sleep disturbance. Results: Ongoing sleep disturbance was significantly associated with worse depression scores as rated by clinician (γ = 1.04, SE =.22, p <.001) and self-report (γ = 1.63, SE =.29, p <.001), as well as worse interpersonal functioning across the course of treatment (γ = 0.09, SE =.02, p <.001). Treatment condition did not predict change in sleep disturbance (γ = −0.13, SE =.14, p = ns). Conclusions: For all patients in the study, sleep disturbance was a predictor of depression and interpersonal functioning for depressed adolescents. Sleep disturbance predicted more depression and interpersonal stress across treatments and led to a slower improvement in depression and interpersonal functioning. These data suggest that sleep disturbance should be a target for future treatment development research among depressed adolescents.

AB - Background: Sleep disturbance is frequently comorbid with depression and sleep complaints are the most common residual symptoms after treatment among adolescents with depression. The present analyses investigated the effect of sleep disturbance in depressed adolescents treated with interpersonal psychotherapy for adolescents (IPT-A) versus treatment as usual (TAU) in school-based mental health clinics. Method: Sixty-three adolescents participated in a randomized clinical trial of IPT-A versus TAU for adolescent depression. Participants were diagnosed with a DSM-IV depressive disorder and assessed for symptoms of depression, interpersonal functioning, and sleep disturbance. Measures were assessed at baseline, session 4 and 8 of treatment, and session 12 for postacute treatment follow-up. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to model change in depression, interpersonal functioning, and sleep disturbance. Results: Ongoing sleep disturbance was significantly associated with worse depression scores as rated by clinician (γ = 1.04, SE =.22, p <.001) and self-report (γ = 1.63, SE =.29, p <.001), as well as worse interpersonal functioning across the course of treatment (γ = 0.09, SE =.02, p <.001). Treatment condition did not predict change in sleep disturbance (γ = −0.13, SE =.14, p = ns). Conclusions: For all patients in the study, sleep disturbance was a predictor of depression and interpersonal functioning for depressed adolescents. Sleep disturbance predicted more depression and interpersonal stress across treatments and led to a slower improvement in depression and interpersonal functioning. These data suggest that sleep disturbance should be a target for future treatment development research among depressed adolescents.

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KW - adolescent

KW - child

KW - clinical trials

KW - sleep disorders

KW - treatment

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DO - 10.1111/camh.12176

M3 - Article

VL - 22

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JO - Child and Adolescent Mental Health

JF - Child and Adolescent Mental Health

SN - 1475-357X

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