Interclause relations and clausal processing

David Townsend, Thomas G. Bever

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In two experiments subjects were interrupted while listening to a two-clause sentence just before the last word of either the initial clause or the final clause. In Experiment I subjects were timed on their decision about whether a verb-object phrase was consistent in meaning with the sentence fragment they had just heard. Overall these decisions were made more quickly when a main clause was interrupted than when a subordinate clause was interrupted, but the size and direction of main-subordinate differences varied with the causal-temporal properties of subordinate clauses. In Experiment II subjects were timed on their decisions about whether a particular probe word had occurred in the sentence fragment. Target position effects differed for main and subordinate clauses, but again, these effects were related to causal-temporal relations between clauses. The two experiments together suggest that interclause semantic relations affect the immediate processing of clauses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)509-521
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1978

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Townsend, David ; Bever, Thomas G. / Interclause relations and clausal processing. In: Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior. 1978 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 509-521.
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Interclause relations and clausal processing. / Townsend, David; Bever, Thomas G.

In: Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, Vol. 17, No. 5, 01.01.1978, p. 509-521.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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