Investigations of hemispheric specialization of self-voice recognition

Christine Rosa, Maryse Lassonde, Claudine Pinard, Julian Keenan, Pascal Belin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three experiments investigated functional asymmetries related to self-recognition in the domain of voices. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to identify one of three presented voices (self, familiar or unknown) by responding with either the right or the left-hand. In Experiment 2, participants were presented with auditory morphs between the self-voice and a familiar voice and were asked to perform a forced-choice decision on speaker identity with either the left or the right-hand. In Experiment 3, participants were presented with continua of auditory morphs between self- or a familiar voice and a famous voice, and were asked to stop the presentation either when the voice became "more famous" or "more familiar/self". While these experiments did not reveal an overall hand difference for self-recognition, the last study, with improved design and controls, suggested a right-hemisphere advantage for self-compared to other-voice recognition, similar to that observed in the visual domain for self-faces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)204-214
Number of pages11
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume68
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2008

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Cerebral Dominance
Hand
Hemispheric Specialization
Experiment

Keywords

  • Behavioural study
  • Laterality
  • Self-awareness
  • Self-perception
  • Voice recognition

Cite this

Rosa, Christine ; Lassonde, Maryse ; Pinard, Claudine ; Keenan, Julian ; Belin, Pascal. / Investigations of hemispheric specialization of self-voice recognition. In: Brain and Cognition. 2008 ; Vol. 68, No. 2. pp. 204-214.
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Investigations of hemispheric specialization of self-voice recognition. / Rosa, Christine; Lassonde, Maryse; Pinard, Claudine; Keenan, Julian; Belin, Pascal.

In: Brain and Cognition, Vol. 68, No. 2, 01.11.2008, p. 204-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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