IODP expedition 347

Baltic Sea basin paleoenvironment and biosphere

the IODP expedition 347 scientific party

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 347 cored sediments from different settings of the Baltic Sea covering the last glacial-interglacial cycle. The main aim was to study the geological development of the Baltic Sea in relation to the extreme climate variability of the region with changing ice cover and major shifts in temperature, salinity, and biological communities. Using the Greatship Manisha as a European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) mission-specific platform, we recovered 1.6 km of core from nine sites of which four were additionally cored for microbiology. The sites covered the gateway to the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean, several sub-basins in the southern Baltic Sea, a deep basin in the central Baltic Sea, and a river estuary in the north. The waxing and waning of the Scandinavian ice sheet has profoundly affected the Baltic Sea sediments. During theWeichselian, progressing glaciers reshaped the submarine landscape and displaced sedimentary deposits from earlier Quaternary time. As the glaciers retreated they left a complex pattern of till, sand, and lacustrine clay, which in the basins has since been covered by a thick deposit of Holocene, organic-rich clay. Due to the stratified water column of the brackish Baltic Sea and the recurrent and widespread anoxia, the deeper basins harbor laminated sediments that provide a unique opportunity for high-resolution chronological studies. The Baltic Sea is a eutrophic intra-continental sea that is strongly impacted by terrestrial runoff and nutrient fluxes. The Holocene deposits are recorded today to be up to 50m deep and geochemically affected by diagenetic alterations driven by organic matter degradation. Many of the cored sequences were highly supersaturated with respect to methane, which caused strong degassing upon core recovery. The depth distributions of conservative sea water ions still reflected the transition at the end of the last glaciation from fresh-water clays to Holocene brackish mud. High-resolution sampling and analyses of interstitial water chemistry revealed the intensive mineralization and zonation of the predominant biogeochemical processes. Quantification of microbial cells in the sediments yielded some of the highest cell densities yet recorded by scientific drilling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalScientific Drilling
Volume20
DOIs
StatePublished - 17 Dec 2015

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Drilling
Sediments
Glaciers
Clay
Deposits
Ice
Water
Microbiology
Degassing
Estuaries
Ports and harbors
Runoff
Catchments
Biological materials
Nutrients
Methane
Sand
Rivers
Fluxes
Sampling

Cite this

the IODP expedition 347 scientific party. / IODP expedition 347 : Baltic Sea basin paleoenvironment and biosphere. In: Scientific Drilling. 2015 ; Vol. 20. pp. 1-12.
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title = "IODP expedition 347: Baltic Sea basin paleoenvironment and biosphere",
abstract = "The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 347 cored sediments from different settings of the Baltic Sea covering the last glacial-interglacial cycle. The main aim was to study the geological development of the Baltic Sea in relation to the extreme climate variability of the region with changing ice cover and major shifts in temperature, salinity, and biological communities. Using the Greatship Manisha as a European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) mission-specific platform, we recovered 1.6 km of core from nine sites of which four were additionally cored for microbiology. The sites covered the gateway to the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean, several sub-basins in the southern Baltic Sea, a deep basin in the central Baltic Sea, and a river estuary in the north. The waxing and waning of the Scandinavian ice sheet has profoundly affected the Baltic Sea sediments. During theWeichselian, progressing glaciers reshaped the submarine landscape and displaced sedimentary deposits from earlier Quaternary time. As the glaciers retreated they left a complex pattern of till, sand, and lacustrine clay, which in the basins has since been covered by a thick deposit of Holocene, organic-rich clay. Due to the stratified water column of the brackish Baltic Sea and the recurrent and widespread anoxia, the deeper basins harbor laminated sediments that provide a unique opportunity for high-resolution chronological studies. The Baltic Sea is a eutrophic intra-continental sea that is strongly impacted by terrestrial runoff and nutrient fluxes. The Holocene deposits are recorded today to be up to 50m deep and geochemically affected by diagenetic alterations driven by organic matter degradation. Many of the cored sequences were highly supersaturated with respect to methane, which caused strong degassing upon core recovery. The depth distributions of conservative sea water ions still reflected the transition at the end of the last glaciation from fresh-water clays to Holocene brackish mud. High-resolution sampling and analyses of interstitial water chemistry revealed the intensive mineralization and zonation of the predominant biogeochemical processes. Quantification of microbial cells in the sediments yielded some of the highest cell densities yet recorded by scientific drilling.",
author = "{the IODP expedition 347 scientific party} and T. Andr{\'e}n and J{\o}rgensen, {B. Barker} and C. Cotterill and S. Green and E. Andr{\'e}n and J. Ash and T. Bauersachs and B. Cragg and Fanget, {A. S.} and A. Fehr and W. Granoszewski and J. Groeneveld and D. Hardisty and E. Herrero-Bervera and O. Hyttinen and Jensen, {J. B.} and S. Johnson and M. Kenzler and A. Kotilainen and U. Kotthoff and Marshall, {I. P.G.} and E. Martin and S. Obrochta and Sandra Passchier and {Quintana Krupinski}, {N. B.} and N. Riedinger and C. Slomp and I. Snowball and A. Stepanova and S. Strano and A. Torti and J. Warnock and N. Xiao and R. Zhang",
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month = "12",
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language = "English",
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IODP expedition 347 : Baltic Sea basin paleoenvironment and biosphere. / the IODP expedition 347 scientific party.

In: Scientific Drilling, Vol. 20, 17.12.2015, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - IODP expedition 347

T2 - Baltic Sea basin paleoenvironment and biosphere

AU - the IODP expedition 347 scientific party

AU - Andrén, T.

AU - Jørgensen, B. Barker

AU - Cotterill, C.

AU - Green, S.

AU - Andrén, E.

AU - Ash, J.

AU - Bauersachs, T.

AU - Cragg, B.

AU - Fanget, A. S.

AU - Fehr, A.

AU - Granoszewski, W.

AU - Groeneveld, J.

AU - Hardisty, D.

AU - Herrero-Bervera, E.

AU - Hyttinen, O.

AU - Jensen, J. B.

AU - Johnson, S.

AU - Kenzler, M.

AU - Kotilainen, A.

AU - Kotthoff, U.

AU - Marshall, I. P.G.

AU - Martin, E.

AU - Obrochta, S.

AU - Passchier, Sandra

AU - Quintana Krupinski, N. B.

AU - Riedinger, N.

AU - Slomp, C.

AU - Snowball, I.

AU - Stepanova, A.

AU - Strano, S.

AU - Torti, A.

AU - Warnock, J.

AU - Xiao, N.

AU - Zhang, R.

PY - 2015/12/17

Y1 - 2015/12/17

N2 - The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 347 cored sediments from different settings of the Baltic Sea covering the last glacial-interglacial cycle. The main aim was to study the geological development of the Baltic Sea in relation to the extreme climate variability of the region with changing ice cover and major shifts in temperature, salinity, and biological communities. Using the Greatship Manisha as a European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) mission-specific platform, we recovered 1.6 km of core from nine sites of which four were additionally cored for microbiology. The sites covered the gateway to the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean, several sub-basins in the southern Baltic Sea, a deep basin in the central Baltic Sea, and a river estuary in the north. The waxing and waning of the Scandinavian ice sheet has profoundly affected the Baltic Sea sediments. During theWeichselian, progressing glaciers reshaped the submarine landscape and displaced sedimentary deposits from earlier Quaternary time. As the glaciers retreated they left a complex pattern of till, sand, and lacustrine clay, which in the basins has since been covered by a thick deposit of Holocene, organic-rich clay. Due to the stratified water column of the brackish Baltic Sea and the recurrent and widespread anoxia, the deeper basins harbor laminated sediments that provide a unique opportunity for high-resolution chronological studies. The Baltic Sea is a eutrophic intra-continental sea that is strongly impacted by terrestrial runoff and nutrient fluxes. The Holocene deposits are recorded today to be up to 50m deep and geochemically affected by diagenetic alterations driven by organic matter degradation. Many of the cored sequences were highly supersaturated with respect to methane, which caused strong degassing upon core recovery. The depth distributions of conservative sea water ions still reflected the transition at the end of the last glaciation from fresh-water clays to Holocene brackish mud. High-resolution sampling and analyses of interstitial water chemistry revealed the intensive mineralization and zonation of the predominant biogeochemical processes. Quantification of microbial cells in the sediments yielded some of the highest cell densities yet recorded by scientific drilling.

AB - The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 347 cored sediments from different settings of the Baltic Sea covering the last glacial-interglacial cycle. The main aim was to study the geological development of the Baltic Sea in relation to the extreme climate variability of the region with changing ice cover and major shifts in temperature, salinity, and biological communities. Using the Greatship Manisha as a European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) mission-specific platform, we recovered 1.6 km of core from nine sites of which four were additionally cored for microbiology. The sites covered the gateway to the North Sea and Atlantic Ocean, several sub-basins in the southern Baltic Sea, a deep basin in the central Baltic Sea, and a river estuary in the north. The waxing and waning of the Scandinavian ice sheet has profoundly affected the Baltic Sea sediments. During theWeichselian, progressing glaciers reshaped the submarine landscape and displaced sedimentary deposits from earlier Quaternary time. As the glaciers retreated they left a complex pattern of till, sand, and lacustrine clay, which in the basins has since been covered by a thick deposit of Holocene, organic-rich clay. Due to the stratified water column of the brackish Baltic Sea and the recurrent and widespread anoxia, the deeper basins harbor laminated sediments that provide a unique opportunity for high-resolution chronological studies. The Baltic Sea is a eutrophic intra-continental sea that is strongly impacted by terrestrial runoff and nutrient fluxes. The Holocene deposits are recorded today to be up to 50m deep and geochemically affected by diagenetic alterations driven by organic matter degradation. Many of the cored sequences were highly supersaturated with respect to methane, which caused strong degassing upon core recovery. The depth distributions of conservative sea water ions still reflected the transition at the end of the last glaciation from fresh-water clays to Holocene brackish mud. High-resolution sampling and analyses of interstitial water chemistry revealed the intensive mineralization and zonation of the predominant biogeochemical processes. Quantification of microbial cells in the sediments yielded some of the highest cell densities yet recorded by scientific drilling.

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U2 - 10.5194/sd-20-1-2015

DO - 10.5194/sd-20-1-2015

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JO - Scientific Drilling

JF - Scientific Drilling

SN - 1816-8957

ER -