Leaching of organic matter and iodine, formation of iodinated disinfection by-products and toxic risk from Laminaria japonica during simulated household cooking

Shunke Ding, Yang Deng, Menglin Wu, Ruixin Qu, Zhenqi Du, Wenhai Chu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs) exhibited potential health risk owing to the high toxicity. Our recent study demonstrated that I-DBPs from Laminaria japonica (Haidai), the commonly edible seaweed, upon simulated household cooking condition were several hundred times more than the concentration of drinking water. Here, the characterization of Haidai and its leachate tandem with the formation, identification and toxicity of I-DBPs from the cooking of Haidai were systemically investigated. The dominant organic matter in Haidai leachate were polysaccharides, while the highest iodine specie was iodide (∼90% of total iodine). Several unknown I-DBPs generated from the cooking of Haidai were tentatively proposed, of which 3,5-diiodo-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde was dominant specie. Following a simulated household cooking with real chloraminated tap water, the presence of Haidai sharply increased aggregate iodinated trihalomethanes, iodinated haloacetic acids, and total organic iodine concentrations to 97.4 ± 7.6 μg/L,16.4 ± 2.1 μg/L, and 0.53 ± 0.06 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, the acute toxicity of Haidai soup to Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 was around 7.3 times higher than that of tap water in terms of EC50. These results demonstrated that the yield of I-DBPs from the cooking of Haidai and other seaweed should be carefully considered.

Original languageEnglish
Article number132241
JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
Volume459
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Oct 2023

Keywords

  • Chloramination
  • Household cooking
  • Iodinated disinfection by-products
  • Laminaria japonica (Haidai)
  • Tap water

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