Let our voices be heard

Urban minority adolescents share their perspectives regarding substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention messages

Robert Reid, Pauline Garcia-Reid, Bradley Forenza, Caitlin Eckert, Melissa Carrier, Stephanie Drag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. This study explored the substance abuse and human immunodeficiency virus prevention needs of urban minority adolescents.

Design. Six 1-hour focus groups.

Setting. Two high schools and two community-based organizations located in the city of Paterson, New Jersey.

Participants. The sample included 41 African-American and Latino youth, ranging in ages from 13 to 18 years.

Method. Data were collected through six focus group interviews. Each group discussion was audiorecorded and transcribed. Qualitative software was then used to facilitate the processes of thematic analysis, until emergent themes transcended the data. To bolster the rigor and confirmability of analysis, additional researchers coded stratified selections of transcript.

Results. Study participants were able to identify the environmental threats and structural deficits impacting their city. Few of the youth were able to recognize substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention messages in their immediate surroundings. Additionally, most participants indicated that prevention messages must be delivered in authentic ways from relatable sources in order to resonate with their audience.

Conclusion. Our findings emphasize the importance of infusing the adolescents' voices into the design and implementation of health promotion messages, which could serve to increase their receptivity and responsiveness, and the overall resonance of the interventions. (Am J Health Promot 2014;29[2]:107- 114.).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-114
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2014

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substance abuse
Substance-Related Disorders
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
minority
HIV
adolescent
Focus Groups
health promotion
group discussion
deficit
Group
Health Promotion
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
threat
Software
Research Personnel
Organizations
Interviews

Keywords

  • Community empowerment
  • Focus groups
  • Health focus: social health
  • Local community
  • Outcome measure: behavioral
  • Prevention research. manuscript format: research
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Racial and ethnic minority youth
  • Research purpose: descriptive
  • Risk and protective factors
  • Setting: school
  • Strategy: built environment
  • Study design: qualitative
  • Substance abuse and hiv/aids health promotion messages
  • Target population age: youth
  • Target population circumstances: geographic location

Cite this

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title = "Let our voices be heard: Urban minority adolescents share their perspectives regarding substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention messages",
abstract = "Purpose. This study explored the substance abuse and human immunodeficiency virus prevention needs of urban minority adolescents.Design. Six 1-hour focus groups.Setting. Two high schools and two community-based organizations located in the city of Paterson, New Jersey.Participants. The sample included 41 African-American and Latino youth, ranging in ages from 13 to 18 years.Method. Data were collected through six focus group interviews. Each group discussion was audiorecorded and transcribed. Qualitative software was then used to facilitate the processes of thematic analysis, until emergent themes transcended the data. To bolster the rigor and confirmability of analysis, additional researchers coded stratified selections of transcript.Results. Study participants were able to identify the environmental threats and structural deficits impacting their city. Few of the youth were able to recognize substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention messages in their immediate surroundings. Additionally, most participants indicated that prevention messages must be delivered in authentic ways from relatable sources in order to resonate with their audience.Conclusion. Our findings emphasize the importance of infusing the adolescents' voices into the design and implementation of health promotion messages, which could serve to increase their receptivity and responsiveness, and the overall resonance of the interventions. (Am J Health Promot 2014;29[2]:107- 114.).",
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author = "Robert Reid and Pauline Garcia-Reid and Bradley Forenza and Caitlin Eckert and Melissa Carrier and Stephanie Drag",
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Let our voices be heard : Urban minority adolescents share their perspectives regarding substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention messages. / Reid, Robert; Garcia-Reid, Pauline; Forenza, Bradley; Eckert, Caitlin; Carrier, Melissa; Drag, Stephanie.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.11.2014, p. 107-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Let our voices be heard

T2 - Urban minority adolescents share their perspectives regarding substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention messages

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AU - Garcia-Reid, Pauline

AU - Forenza, Bradley

AU - Eckert, Caitlin

AU - Carrier, Melissa

AU - Drag, Stephanie

PY - 2014/11/1

Y1 - 2014/11/1

N2 - Purpose. This study explored the substance abuse and human immunodeficiency virus prevention needs of urban minority adolescents.Design. Six 1-hour focus groups.Setting. Two high schools and two community-based organizations located in the city of Paterson, New Jersey.Participants. The sample included 41 African-American and Latino youth, ranging in ages from 13 to 18 years.Method. Data were collected through six focus group interviews. Each group discussion was audiorecorded and transcribed. Qualitative software was then used to facilitate the processes of thematic analysis, until emergent themes transcended the data. To bolster the rigor and confirmability of analysis, additional researchers coded stratified selections of transcript.Results. Study participants were able to identify the environmental threats and structural deficits impacting their city. Few of the youth were able to recognize substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention messages in their immediate surroundings. Additionally, most participants indicated that prevention messages must be delivered in authentic ways from relatable sources in order to resonate with their audience.Conclusion. Our findings emphasize the importance of infusing the adolescents' voices into the design and implementation of health promotion messages, which could serve to increase their receptivity and responsiveness, and the overall resonance of the interventions. (Am J Health Promot 2014;29[2]:107- 114.).

AB - Purpose. This study explored the substance abuse and human immunodeficiency virus prevention needs of urban minority adolescents.Design. Six 1-hour focus groups.Setting. Two high schools and two community-based organizations located in the city of Paterson, New Jersey.Participants. The sample included 41 African-American and Latino youth, ranging in ages from 13 to 18 years.Method. Data were collected through six focus group interviews. Each group discussion was audiorecorded and transcribed. Qualitative software was then used to facilitate the processes of thematic analysis, until emergent themes transcended the data. To bolster the rigor and confirmability of analysis, additional researchers coded stratified selections of transcript.Results. Study participants were able to identify the environmental threats and structural deficits impacting their city. Few of the youth were able to recognize substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention messages in their immediate surroundings. Additionally, most participants indicated that prevention messages must be delivered in authentic ways from relatable sources in order to resonate with their audience.Conclusion. Our findings emphasize the importance of infusing the adolescents' voices into the design and implementation of health promotion messages, which could serve to increase their receptivity and responsiveness, and the overall resonance of the interventions. (Am J Health Promot 2014;29[2]:107- 114.).

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