Loneliness, Stress, and Social Support in Young Adulthood

Does the Source of Support Matter?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social support protects individuals against adversity throughout the lifespan, and is especially salient during times of intense social change, such as during the transition to adulthood. Focusing on three relationship-specific sources of social support (family, friends, and romantic partners), the current study examined the stress-buffering function of social support against loneliness and whether the association between social support and loneliness with stress held constant would vary by its source. The role of gender in these associations was also considered. The sample consisted of 636 ethnically diverse college youth (age range 18–25; 80 % female). The results suggest that the stress-buffering role of social support against loneliness varies by its source. Only support from friends buffered the association between stress and loneliness. Further, when stress was held constant, the association between social support and loneliness differed by the sources, in that support from friends or romantic partners (but not from family) was negatively associated with loneliness. Regarding gender differences, the adverse impact of lower levels of familial or friends’ support on loneliness was greater in females than in males. This research advances our understanding of social support among college-aged youth; implications of the findings and directions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)568-580
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2016

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Loneliness
Social Support
adulthood
social support
life-span
Social Change
social change
gender-specific factors
gender
Research

Keywords

  • Gender differences
  • Loneliness
  • Multiple additive moderation
  • Social support
  • Stress
  • Young adulthood

Cite this

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title = "Loneliness, Stress, and Social Support in Young Adulthood: Does the Source of Support Matter?",
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Loneliness, Stress, and Social Support in Young Adulthood : Does the Source of Support Matter? / Lee, Chih-Yuan; Goldstein, Sara.

In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Vol. 45, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 568-580.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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