Look over there! Unilateral gaze increases geographical memory of the 50 United States

Ruth Propper, Tad T. Brunyé, Stephen D. Christman, Ashley Januszewskia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on their specialized processing abilities, the left and right hemispheres of the brain may not contribute equally to recall of general world knowledge. US college students recalled the verbal names and spatial locations of the 50 US states while sustaining leftward or rightward unilateral gaze, a procedure that selectively activates the contralateral hemisphere. Compared to a no-unilateral gaze control, right gaze/left hemisphere activation resulted in better recall, demonstrating left hemisphere superiority in recall of general world knowledge and offering equivocal support for the hemispheric encoding asymmetry model of memory. Unilateral gaze- regardless of direction- improved recall of spatial, but not verbal, information. Future research could investigate the conditions under which unilateral gaze increases recall. Sustained unilateral gaze can be used as a simple, inexpensive, means for testing theories of hemispheric specialization of cognitive functions. Results support an overall deficit in US geographical knowledge in undergraduate college students.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-62
Number of pages4
JournalBrain and Cognition
Volume78
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Cerebral Dominance
Students
Aptitude
Cognition
Names
Brain
Direction compound
Left Hemisphere
World Knowledge
College Students

Keywords

  • Hemisphere
  • Lateralization
  • Memory
  • Semantic

Cite this

Propper, Ruth ; Brunyé, Tad T. ; Christman, Stephen D. ; Januszewskia, Ashley. / Look over there! Unilateral gaze increases geographical memory of the 50 United States. In: Brain and Cognition. 2012 ; Vol. 78, No. 1. pp. 59-62.
@article{f4c9db10f2f947e381804ab905df151e,
title = "Look over there! Unilateral gaze increases geographical memory of the 50 United States",
abstract = "Based on their specialized processing abilities, the left and right hemispheres of the brain may not contribute equally to recall of general world knowledge. US college students recalled the verbal names and spatial locations of the 50 US states while sustaining leftward or rightward unilateral gaze, a procedure that selectively activates the contralateral hemisphere. Compared to a no-unilateral gaze control, right gaze/left hemisphere activation resulted in better recall, demonstrating left hemisphere superiority in recall of general world knowledge and offering equivocal support for the hemispheric encoding asymmetry model of memory. Unilateral gaze- regardless of direction- improved recall of spatial, but not verbal, information. Future research could investigate the conditions under which unilateral gaze increases recall. Sustained unilateral gaze can be used as a simple, inexpensive, means for testing theories of hemispheric specialization of cognitive functions. Results support an overall deficit in US geographical knowledge in undergraduate college students.",
keywords = "Hemisphere, Lateralization, Memory, Semantic",
author = "Ruth Propper and Bruny{\'e}, {Tad T.} and Christman, {Stephen D.} and Ashley Januszewskia",
year = "2012",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.bandc.2011.10.002",
language = "English",
volume = "78",
pages = "59--62",
journal = "Brain and Cognition",
issn = "0278-2626",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

Look over there! Unilateral gaze increases geographical memory of the 50 United States. / Propper, Ruth; Brunyé, Tad T.; Christman, Stephen D.; Januszewskia, Ashley.

In: Brain and Cognition, Vol. 78, No. 1, 01.02.2012, p. 59-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Look over there! Unilateral gaze increases geographical memory of the 50 United States

AU - Propper, Ruth

AU - Brunyé, Tad T.

AU - Christman, Stephen D.

AU - Januszewskia, Ashley

PY - 2012/2/1

Y1 - 2012/2/1

N2 - Based on their specialized processing abilities, the left and right hemispheres of the brain may not contribute equally to recall of general world knowledge. US college students recalled the verbal names and spatial locations of the 50 US states while sustaining leftward or rightward unilateral gaze, a procedure that selectively activates the contralateral hemisphere. Compared to a no-unilateral gaze control, right gaze/left hemisphere activation resulted in better recall, demonstrating left hemisphere superiority in recall of general world knowledge and offering equivocal support for the hemispheric encoding asymmetry model of memory. Unilateral gaze- regardless of direction- improved recall of spatial, but not verbal, information. Future research could investigate the conditions under which unilateral gaze increases recall. Sustained unilateral gaze can be used as a simple, inexpensive, means for testing theories of hemispheric specialization of cognitive functions. Results support an overall deficit in US geographical knowledge in undergraduate college students.

AB - Based on their specialized processing abilities, the left and right hemispheres of the brain may not contribute equally to recall of general world knowledge. US college students recalled the verbal names and spatial locations of the 50 US states while sustaining leftward or rightward unilateral gaze, a procedure that selectively activates the contralateral hemisphere. Compared to a no-unilateral gaze control, right gaze/left hemisphere activation resulted in better recall, demonstrating left hemisphere superiority in recall of general world knowledge and offering equivocal support for the hemispheric encoding asymmetry model of memory. Unilateral gaze- regardless of direction- improved recall of spatial, but not verbal, information. Future research could investigate the conditions under which unilateral gaze increases recall. Sustained unilateral gaze can be used as a simple, inexpensive, means for testing theories of hemispheric specialization of cognitive functions. Results support an overall deficit in US geographical knowledge in undergraduate college students.

KW - Hemisphere

KW - Lateralization

KW - Memory

KW - Semantic

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=82455210928&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bandc.2011.10.002

DO - 10.1016/j.bandc.2011.10.002

M3 - Article

VL - 78

SP - 59

EP - 62

JO - Brain and Cognition

JF - Brain and Cognition

SN - 0278-2626

IS - 1

ER -